"Web 2.0" news, interviews, and features

News about Web 2.0

  • Driving innovation at Fidelity Investments

    Fidelity Investments is one of the world's largest providers of financial services, with assets under administration of $4.7 trillion, and it didn't get there by using yesterday's technology. In fact, the company has a standalone group, Fidelity Center for Applied Technology – more commonly referred to as Fidelity Labs -- whose job it is to take the long view, to examine technologies years before they become mainstream and help the firm get a leg up.

  • Twitter: Attack emails drop from 110 million per day to a few thousand

    There used to be a whopping 110 million attack messages per day spoofing the Twitter domain name as cyber-criminals blasted out fake Twitter e-mail at intended victims to try and fool them into opening dangerous malware-infested links and other scams. But by adopting a messaging authentication protocol called Domain-based Message Authentication, Reporting and Conformance (DMARC), Twitter has seen that number drop to a few thousand.

  • 7 highlights from Ethernet inventor Bob Metcalfe's Reddit AMA

    Father of Ethernet Bob Metcalfe bravely dove back into the Reddit Ask Me Anything pool on Wednesday, deftly fielding questions from the masses about everything from techie topics like SDN to news topics like the NSA to random topics like bar fighting.

  • Call centers as social media hubs

    Contact centers are changing rapidly with the arrival of cloud technology and the ability to interact with customers over new social channels, including Twitter. The transformation has implications for everything from how companies deal with customers to the role agents play and how internal groups are best organized. Network World Editor in Chief John Dix caught up with the CEO of LiveOps, Marty Beard, for his take on where we stand and where we're headed.

  • Internet.org looks to 'Facebook for Every Phone'

    The companies behind Internet.org, the organization formed by Facebook, Qualcomm and several others to bring the Internet to areas that still don't have it, released a document (PDF) yesterday detailing some of their plans for the initiative. One section stands out in particular, if only for its title – Facebook for Every Phone.

  • Social media sends Ballmer off with a bang

    The Internet reacted to the news that Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer plans to retire within 12 months as might have been expected – with a flurry of jeers, opprobrium and the occasional heartfelt farewell.

  • Telecommuting from paradise

    Nine years ago, Francie Tanner was working at a technology consulting company in Dallas when she received an email that began, "Dear Sir or Madam, I manage a bank in the country of Anguilla..."

  • One year in, Yammer grows in importance to Microsoft

    For a product once described as Twitter with a business model, Yammer is becoming more nuanced, morphing into an important feature set that will cross over among Microsoft applications. Just as important, it continues seeing growth and popularity among businesses, where it can act as a hook that can encourage current Microsoft customers to upgrade and adopt Microsoft cloud services.