"spam" news, interviews, and features

News about spam

  • Seven hints to stay safe online

    There have been a number of attacks recently against high-profile social networking accounts -- French President Sarkozy, teen pop star Selena Gomez, and even social network wunderkind and Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg have all fallen prey. Web surfing and social networking are here to stay, so the trick is figuring out how to protect your computer and your personal information while you're online.

  • Spam Traffic Returns after Holiday Break

    Spammers are people too...apparently. They have families and want to take a vacation to spend quality time with them over the traditional holiday break just like everyone else. Or, at least that is the way that it appears if you follow the trends in spam traffic.

  • You Too Can Be an l33t 'Whitehat' Hacker for Only US$250

    The concept of ethical or whitehat hacking is nothing new. There is some merit to the "it takes a thief to catch a thief" mentality, and using the same tools employed by malicious attackers to test and fortify networks rather than compromising them. However, when the blackhats start selling "whitehat" hacking tool kits there is good reason to be skeptical.

  • Flash to offer more control over cookies

    Most users are already aware of the risks presented by cookies, the small data files that browsers save on our computers to remember things like login details, or Website preferences.

  • Google adds hacked site alerts to search results

    One of the easiest ways for attackers to lure victims is by planting malware on seemingly innocent-looking Web sites, or actually compromising legitimate Web sites. Google is doing its part to help users make informed decisions about the sites they visit, and avoid having their PCs infected with a new hacked site identification feature being added to Google search results.

  • IE blows away rivals in browser security

    A new report from NSS Labs studies how various Web browsers perform when it comes to blocking socially-engineered attacks. The startling results show that Internet Explorer isn't just better than rival browsers like Chrome and Firefox -- but leaves competitors completely in the dust.

  • McAfee reports malware at all-time high

    McAfee today revealed its McAfee Threat Report for the third quarter of 2010. Information like that provided by McAfee in these quarterly reports is valuable for IT admins -- enabling them to keep a finger on the pulse of malware, and to stay in touch with emerging attack techniques and trends.

  • PayPal users beware of holiday phishing scam

    With Black Friday quickly approaching, and retailers racing to outdo each other with earlier and earlier deals, it is safe to say that the holiday shopping season has begun. If you're shopping online, though, and paying with PayPal -- be warned. There is a phishing attack targeted just for you.

  • Is Microsoft crossing the line with security essentials

    Microsoft has offered free protection with Microsoft Security Essentials (MSE) for some time, and it recently expanded the availability of the antivirus protection for small businesses. A recent move to push out Microsoft Security Essentials to Windows systems that don't have any antivirus protection, however, has some rival security vendors up in arms. From Microsoft's perspective, though, it's a little "damned if you do, damned if you don't".

  • In-depth look at Boonana Malware

    Last week a malware threat emerged that impacted both Windows and Mac OS X systems. To be fair, the attack is more social engineering than PC exploit, but it impacts Mac OS X users just the same. ESET's David Harley has written a more detailed analysis of the Boonana threat, and identified some elements that are contrary to initial reports.

  • Beware fake Microsoft security essentials

    Microsoft Security Essentials is fake. Well, it is and it isn't. Microsoft Security Essentials is a free antimalware protection program from Microsoft, but a new malware threat identified by security software vendor F-Secure is also masquerading as Microsoft Security Essentials. You want to avoid that one.