"online privacy" news, interviews, and features

News about online privacy

  • Facebook Revamps Business Communications

    Facebook has started introducing Private Messages for Pages, a new method of connecting consumers with the businesses they follow on the social network -- but in a way that's less social than before.

  • Opinion: Facebook flaw exposes myth of online privacy

    Facebook has been making headlines again, this time for a flaw that exposed personal photos marked private - including pictures of Mark Zuckerberg and his dog. The glitch is Facebook’s fault, and Facebook responded quickly to address the issue once it was discovered. But, don’t believe for a second that this is the last time private information will be exposed online--on Facebook, or anywhere else.

  • Big question: Can Facebook reshape its privacy image?

    The Federal Trade Commission recently reined in Facebook for its numerous privacy gaffes, but the social network has a long way to go to prove it's worthy of user trust. People are tired of dealing with indirect data leaks, being forced to accept new information-leaking features, and an ever changing set of privacy controls.

  • Privacy: Will Facebook ever get it?

    With Facebook reportedly close to cutting a deal with the U.S. Federal Trade Commission (FTC) over privacy sins dating back to 2009, the question remains whether or not the social network's brain trust really gets the privacy issue.

  • Facebook's frictionless sharing: A privacy guide

    By Ian Paul | 27 September, 2011 02:30

    Should you be concerned about your privacy on Facebook's recently announced "frictionless sharing" plan that lets online sites and services automatically share your activity with your Facebook friends?

  • Facebook's planned news feed changes should worry you

    Facebook is tinkering with our news feeds in order to give marketers and developers more visibility. According to the Wall Street Journal, the changes may allow the social networking site to gather even more information on its users.

  • TrackMeNot add-on keeps search engine profilers confused

    The free TrackMeNot Firefox add-on takes a unique and creative approach to protecting your privacy from search engines that can create profiles of you based on terms you search for. Rather than hiding your searches from them in some way, it takes the exact opposite tack: It inundates search engines with a blizzard of background searches from you, so that no practical profile can be built because there are too many random searches. It generates those search terms from a group of RSS feeds from sites including the New York Times, CNN, and others.

  • Facebook backstabs Google and you lose

    Thanks to an anti-Google smear campaign ordered by Facebook and carried out by a PR agency, the relationship between Facebook and Google is unquestionably broken beyond repair. And that's bad news for users of both services.