Software: Opinions

Opinions
  • Facebook: The other Internet

    You can do almost everything online. Most people spend most of their web time doing just three things: communicating, buying things and consuming content.

  • IT leadership lessons from Sun Tzu: Passion matters

    I recently attended an event celebrating the 50th Anniversary of Moore's law and was entranced by some of the old stories from Intel's founding. Part of what I found fascinating was the virtual passing of the torch from the passionate founder Gordon Moore to Intel's current CEO Brian Krzanich.

  • Europe's war against U.S. tech is wrongheaded

    What do Facebook, Apple, Google, Amazon and Netflix have in common? In addition to being U.S. tech giants, they're in the crosshairs of European regulators and may face big fines and stiff rules reining in the way they operate on the continent.

  • What does HP think it's doing?

    Winston Churchill once said of Russia, "It is a riddle, wrapped in a mystery, inside an enigma." Now, I don't deal with international politics. I just write about technology. But when I've looked at HP lately I've been left thinking of its strategy as, well, "a riddle, wrapped in a mystery, inside an enigma."

  • Sony reminds us all what a pathetically weak link email is

    Sony is reliving the nightmare that <a href="http://www.computerworld.com/article/2858358/fbi-calls-sony-hack-organized-but-declines-to-name-source-or-finger-north-korea.html">its hacked databases</a> gave rise to late last year, now that <a href="http://www.computerworld.com/article/2910891/wikileaks-publishes-searchable-database-of-hacked-sony-docs.html">Wikileaks has thoughtfully published all of the leaked documents in a searchable database</a>. Really, they are the most courteous hoodlums ever.

  • Discovering a blind eye to vulnerabilities

    Last week, I was horrified to discover a problem with my <a href="http://www.computerworld.com/article/2569669/security0/two-sides-of-vulnerability-scanning.html">vulnerability scanner</a>. The product I use relies on a user account to connect to our Microsoft Windows servers and workstations to check them for vulnerable versions of software, and that user account had never been configured properly. As a result, the scanner has been blind to a lot of vulnerabilities. And this has been going on for a long time.

  • Let's rethink email

    I've been using email longer than most people (more than a quarter of a century), so I think I have the credibility to say it's overdue for an overhaul.

  • iOS 8 hate

    Enough is enough. Apple's iOS 8 mobile operating system came out in mid-September. Since then, the company has delivered seven -- count 'em, seven -- patch releases, and iOS 8 still doesn't work that well. Argh!

  • Microsoft Outlook Calendar Corruption, Lost Meetings, Duplicate Appointments - April/2015 Update

    Over the past 5-yrs, organizations have complained about Microsoft Outlook calendaring problems where users describe issues of calendar appointments not showing up, meeting appointments disappearing, calendar delegate issues occurring, just overall "odd" behavior of calendars. It usually happens in mixed environments where some users are Apple Mac users, and some users (frequently the exec admin / delegate) running Windows, and typically active use of iPhones, iPads, Android, or other mobile devices and tablets. And over the past 5-yrs, I have actively blogged about the problem and the solution to FIX the calendaring inconsistencies.

  • We've got net neutrality. Now the real work begins.

    Now that <a href="http://www.computerworld.com/article/2889261/fcc-approves-net-neutrality-rules-reclassifies-broadband-as-utility.html">net neutrality is the law of the land</a>, you may feel inclined to pat yourself on the back for a job well done. After all, a big reason the FCC backed net neutrality was the outpouring of support for it.

  • Why Facebook Messenger will fail as a 'platform'

    Now we know why Facebook ripped Messenger out of the mobile version of the Facebook app last April: Messenger was destined to become a "platform" in its own right, complete with an API and developer program to help and encourage software companies to make Facebook Messenger-specific apps.

  • The signs of spring: Birds, flowers and new tech

    Back in the dark ages, when the only way to get onscreen entertainment was by tuning in a television set at a specific time (get home late? miss your favorite show? too bad for you!), networks had a habit of scheduling similar shows opposite each other. The notion was presumably, that the competition would cause one show to win out over the other, which would eventually drop in the ratings and get cancelled. The idea that viewers might be interested in seeing both apparently was not in the networks' psychology.

  • Where's the data?

    It's a time-honored tradition: U.S. businesses find ways to skirt inconvenient or expensive laws by moving operations to other countries. Thus we have had U.S. corporations operating overseas to exploit child labor, run sweatshops or avoid taxes and rigorous health and safety inspections. Now the U.S. government says something similar is happening in regards to email.

  • Apple 'springs forward' with more than just the Watch

    When Apple execs took the stage on Monday, virtually everyone expected them to focus on the soon-to-be-released Apple Watch. That, they did. The Watch, we now know, arrives in retail on April 24, and it did indeed get most of the attention. But it wasn't the only thing to catch my eye.

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