Software: Opinions

Opinions
  • Google on Apple: The end is near

    The chat room and social network religious wars between Apple and Google demand that you take sides. But I've always felt that the best experience includes a cherry-picking of Apple hardware, Google services and apps from both.

  • The Internet of Growing Things

    Earlier this month, in Monterey, Calif., a meeting organized by the Produce Marketing Association provided an opportunity for a group of local growers of crops such as lettuce, artichokes and strawberries to find out how the latest digital technologies were changing agriculture. Participants heard about how technologies like robots, drones and predictive analytics could help them improve their operations.

  • EU regulators misunderstand big data

    Some <a href="http://www.wsj.com/articles/big-data-looms-as-next-battle-in-europe-1429217668">European Union regulators reportedly</a> are concerned that major Internet companies such as Google and Facebook gain an unfair competitive advantage from the detailed consumer data they hold, since other companies can never hope to amass anywhere near as much of it. In addition, some regulators worry that with less competition, these data-rich companies will disregard their customers' privacy preferences and become more invasive. Not only are these regulators wrong, but by mistakenly classifying big data as anti-competitive and anti-consumer, they risk driving European companies away from the most productive uses of data, which would harm the competitiveness of European businesses and limit the potential consumer benefits.

  • Open Source Meets Telecom at NFV World Congress

    When Linux first became a serious challenger for enterprise-class infrastructure, traditional IT vendors had to contend and to rationalize just what exactly this open source thing was. The initial response from many vendors was to attempt to stop it, but it only grew.

  • Facebook: The other Internet

    You can do almost everything online. Most people spend most of their web time doing just three things: communicating, buying things and consuming content.

  • IT leadership lessons from Sun Tzu: Passion matters

    I recently attended an event celebrating the 50th Anniversary of Moore's law and was entranced by some of the old stories from Intel's founding. Part of what I found fascinating was the virtual passing of the torch from the passionate founder Gordon Moore to Intel's current CEO Brian Krzanich.

  • Europe's war against U.S. tech is wrongheaded

    What do Facebook, Apple, Google, Amazon and Netflix have in common? In addition to being U.S. tech giants, they're in the crosshairs of European regulators and may face big fines and stiff rules reining in the way they operate on the continent.

  • What does HP think it's doing?

    Winston Churchill once said of Russia, "It is a riddle, wrapped in a mystery, inside an enigma." Now, I don't deal with international politics. I just write about technology. But when I've looked at HP lately I've been left thinking of its strategy as, well, "a riddle, wrapped in a mystery, inside an enigma."

  • Sony reminds us all what a pathetically weak link email is

    Sony is reliving the nightmare that <a href="http://www.computerworld.com/article/2858358/fbi-calls-sony-hack-organized-but-declines-to-name-source-or-finger-north-korea.html">its hacked databases</a> gave rise to late last year, now that <a href="http://www.computerworld.com/article/2910891/wikileaks-publishes-searchable-database-of-hacked-sony-docs.html">Wikileaks has thoughtfully published all of the leaked documents in a searchable database</a>. Really, they are the most courteous hoodlums ever.

  • Discovering a blind eye to vulnerabilities

    Last week, I was horrified to discover a problem with my <a href="http://www.computerworld.com/article/2569669/security0/two-sides-of-vulnerability-scanning.html">vulnerability scanner</a>. The product I use relies on a user account to connect to our Microsoft Windows servers and workstations to check them for vulnerable versions of software, and that user account had never been configured properly. As a result, the scanner has been blind to a lot of vulnerabilities. And this has been going on for a long time.

  • Let's rethink email

    I've been using email longer than most people (more than a quarter of a century), so I think I have the credibility to say it's overdue for an overhaul.

  • iOS 8 hate

    Enough is enough. Apple's iOS 8 mobile operating system came out in mid-September. Since then, the company has delivered seven -- count 'em, seven -- patch releases, and iOS 8 still doesn't work that well. Argh!

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