Networking: Opinions

Opinions
  • Revisiting Comcast's Xfinity public hotspot strategy

    Last week I wrote about Comcast's plan to build the nation's biggest Wi-Fi service by co-opting their customers' Xfinity gateways and, following a detailed conversation with a representative from Comcast's Corporate Communications group, I have some corrections to make and quite a few additional concerns to add.

  • The PSTN transition to VoIP: Going green

    We've discussed some of the advantages of transitioning the PSTN to IP, but there we haven't yet covered the environmental implications of the pending transition. At their annual partner conference Perspectives14, GENBAND hosted a discussion which addressed the power costs behind the PSTN, pointing out the benefits an IP transition.

  • Hungry ants knock out FiOS service ... again

    Everyone keeps asking if the ants actually ate their way through the fiber optic cable and I do not know the answer. What is certain is that they chewed through the outer casing and caused enough damage to knock out TV, phone and Internet service to my house: the Verizon triple no-play.

  • Microsoft introduces Interflow: Sharing cybersecurity threats in near real-time

    Microsoft announced Interflow, a new platform for sharing cybersecurity threats in near real-time. Although it's currently available only in "private preview" for Microsoft Active Protections Program (MAPP) members, security threat information will be shared faster, creating a "collectively stronger cybersecurity ecosystem." In the long run that means protecting people better and more quickly.

  • Why Facebook's SDN switch won't affect Cisco's customers

    Last week, Facebook announced a new product that's supposed to have the networking industry trembling. There were many news stories about Facebook's new homegrown SDN switch, known by the codename "Wedge" that's supposed to be the next big threat to Cisco and the traditional networking vendors. The operating system on the product runs Facebook's proprietary version of Linux called FBOSS.

  • Riverbed goes mobile with AppInternals 9.0

    Riverbed, the company known best for its Steelhead WAN Optimization product, has beefed up its Application Performance Management (APM) suite. In 2012, Riverbed acquired OPNET for a cool billion to complement the network performance management (NPM) suite it inherited when it purchased Mazu. The product formerly known as OPNET, AppInternals Xpert was rebranded to SteelCentral AppInternals, and this week the company released version 9.0 of the suite.

  • Endpoint security demands organizational changes

    Pity endpoint security software. Venerable antivirus has gotten a bad reputation for being an ineffective commodity product. This situation is illustrated by some recently published ESG research (note: I am an employee of ESG). Security professionals working at enterprise organizations (i.e. more than 1,000 employees) were given a series of statements and asked whether they agreed or disagreed with each. The research revealed that:

  • NBC Sports disputes World Cup streaming record

    The World Cup match between Cameroon and Mexico was viewed 2.8 million times, setting a world record for the most views of a sporting match streamed over the internet. However, NBC Sports still claims it holds the record for the most internet views of a sporting match, Variety reported yesterday, even though the record-setting 2014 Olympic Semi Final hockey game between the U.S. and Canada generated only 2.1 million views.

  • Why Netflix video quality has fluctuated this year

    John Oliver's recent net neutrality diatribe, which has attracted more than 3.8 million YouTube views, spotlights Netflix ISP Speed Index data showing Netflix streaming quality deteriorating and then improving after Netflix and Comcast began to directly connect. But what does the Netflix Index data really show?

  • Open Networking: The whale that swallowed SDN

    The year is 2011, the Open Networking Foundation has just been formed by the largest Cloud and telecom service providers, software giants and academia – all of whom united at the inaugural Open Networking Summit under the common theme that the networking industry had fallen behind, its closed model stifled innovation and was not keeping up with the rest of the computer science discipline or the needs of emerging application and business requirements.

  • Why the Tail-F acquisition is a big win for Cisco

    This morning, Cisco announced its intention to purchase Sweden-based Tail-f Systems for about $175 million in cash and retention-based incentives. That seems reasonable for a software company that did about $30 million last year and is well aligned with the emerging SDN/NFV markets. Additionally, being headquartered in Sweden means Cisco can pay for this out of its foreign war chest instead of tapping into domestic cash.

  • Get ready for the summer of smartwatches

    Smartwatches have been around for a while, but they have been bulky and clunky, and of interest primarily to gadget fans. This summer, all of that will change, says Computerworld columnist Mike Elgan.