Stories by Serdar Yegulalp

  • In Pictures: 10 file-sharing options

    Even with all the online storage now available, sharing files with colleagues can still be a problem. We look at 10 online services -- including Dropbox, Google Drive and YouSendIt -- that can help you upload and/or download your data.

  • In Pictures: Big security, small devices

    With the popularity of smartphones and tablets among workers, IT departments are trying to accommodate the influx of consumer tech - and manufacturers are trying to help. Here are some consumer devices that have been tweaked for the enterprise - and the software that's being used.

  • The ABCs of camera phone technology

    Camera phones have come a long way since the first sub-megapixel models of the late 1990s and early 2000s. Aside from being more broadly available -- there's barely a phone sold today that doesn't have a camera -- they've also become much less of a novelty and much more useful as cameras.

  • Hands-on: 3 comment platforms make blog management easier

    Anyone who manages a high-traffic website knows the importance of the phrase "audience engagement." That's Webspeak for having an audience of readers who regularly post lively comments, keep the discussion going and give your site another reason to be visited.

  • 6 data recovery tools for SD cards, USB drives and more

    As USB thumb drives and memory cards get larger and cheaper, it's getting easier to trust much more of your data to them. It's also much easier to mistakenly erase data or have them hiccup on you. And if you're in the habit of holding on to that data for too long -- for example, not transferring photos from your camera's memory card -- disaster is almost guaranteed to strike at some point. What happens then?

  • Google Chrome remixes worth trying out

    Once upon a time there was a browser named Firefox -- an open source project that many people happily picked up and spun off into their own versions with names like Iceweasel and Pale Moon. Now the same thing has happened with Google Chrome. Its open source incarnation, Chromium, has become the basis for a slew of spinoffs, remixes, and alternative versions.

  • The best Android apps for boosting battery life

    The single most common complaint you'll hear about any smartphone is how lousy the battery life is. Granted, battery life is like mileage on a car - it will vary widely depending on your usage. You can always buy more time by making fewer calls or downloading less data. But then, you probably carry your smartphone in order to use it.

  • Teach your router new tricks with DD-WRT

    With each passing year, hardware devices grow less dependent on proprietary components and more reliant on open source technologies. Network routers are among the main beneficiaries of this trend, especially those that can support a variety of third-party open source firmware projects. One variant, <a href="http://www.dd-wrt.com/">DD-WRT</a> has become a common out-of-the-box option for many routers, but also exists in stand-alone implementations that can be placed on routers that support it. Hundreds of routers can run DD-WRT firmware, including nearly 100 Linksys models alone.

  • Speech recognition: Your smartphone gets smarter

    When we were kids, my friends and I used to play a game where we fantasized about which technologies from Star Trek were most likely to be real-world inventions within our lifetimes. The transporter and warp drive -- not likely. But the communicator, the voice-commanded computer and the universal translator -- very likely.

  • Making money with mobile apps

    To many companies and independent developers -- not just software publishers -- mobile apps represent something even more powerful and important than a brand-new platform to deploy apps on. It's a new and dynamic source of revenue, one with a lot of room to grow. And given how tough it can be to make money selling software at all, especially in this world of open-source and free Web apps, any proven way to make money in that field can become a magnet.

  • Free desktop tools that aren't OpenOffice

    Most everyone who's had some experience with free open source software has learned about the OpenOffice.org suite of productivity programs: a word processor, spreadsheet, presentation, database, and drawing tool that provide a good deal of the functionality of their commercial counterparts. For users who need powerful productivity tools but don't require a high degree of compatibility with Microsoft-formatted files, OpenOffice.org is almost a no-brainer.

  • Diaspora: First peek at Facebook's challenger

    When word began to circulate about <a href="http://blogs.computerworld.com/16974/diaspora_its_no_facebook_yet">Diaspora</a>, the hype about it being a potential <a href="http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9157638/Facebook_Complete_coverage">Facebook</a> killer took on a life of its own before a single line of code had been released. Now the <a href="http://www.joindiaspora.com/">first developer's alpha version of Diaspora</a> is out in the wild, and the hype is being replaced with scrutiny and well-deserved skepticism.

  • Netbooks vs. iPads -- can they coexist?

    The term "disruptive," a common buzzword in tech journalism, is typically used to describe something that jars people out of existing ways of doing things, and provides them with both new ways to do the old things and new things to do. Weather-beaten as the expression might be, it fits when talking about two products that took personal computing by storm over the past couple of years: the iPad and the netbook.