Stories by Ms. Smith

  • Drive a dumb car but buy Tesla stocks?

    Even the USENIX Security Symposium continued the summer of car hacking theme. While some people suggest sticking with a dumb car and others warn large-scale ransomware infections could start at car dealerships, a Morgan Stanley analyst says to buy Tesla stock because it could almost double.

  • 'Largest DDoS attack' in GitHub's history targets anticensorship projects

    GitHub has been hammered by a continuous DDoS attack for three days. It's the "largest DDoS attack in github.com's history." The attack is aimed at anti-censorship GreatFire and CN-NYTimes projects, but affected all of GitHub; the traffic is coming from China as attackers are reportedly using China's search engine Baidu for the purpose of "HTTP hijacking."

  • 9 of 10 online accounts intercepted by NSA are not intended surveillance target

    Although NSA officials were not sure about what all documents Edward Snowden took with him, they've changed their tune a few times after some new leak proves their previous proclamations to be false...like when former NSA Chief Keith Alexander admitted to lying about phone surveillance stopping 54 terror plots. Despite a year of NSA officials claiming that Edward Snowden had access to reports about NSA surveillance, but no access to actual surveillance intercepts, that ends up being lie too.

  • Microsoft hammers No-IP, collateral damage includes Hacking Team's legal malware

    Microsoft brought the hammer down on No-IP and seized 22 of their domains. They also filed a civil case against "Mohamed Benabdellah and Naser Al Mutairi, and a U.S. company, Vitalwerks Internet Solutions, LLC (doing business as No-IP.com), for their roles in creating, controlling, and assisting in infecting millions of computers with malicious software--harming Microsoft, its customers and the public at large."

  • Government can exploit loopholes for warrantless surveillance on Americans

    Bright minds from Harvard University and Boston University collaborated on a new research paper that looks at how the government can exploit legal loopholes as well as "technical realities of Internet communications" to get around Americans' Fourth Amendment rights and hoover up their electronic communications.

  • Microsoft introduces Interflow: Sharing cybersecurity threats in near real-time

    Microsoft announced Interflow, a new platform for sharing cybersecurity threats in near real-time. Although it's currently available only in "private preview" for Microsoft Active Protections Program (MAPP) members, security threat information will be shared faster, creating a "collectively stronger cybersecurity ecosystem." In the long run that means protecting people better and more quickly.

  • Microsoft kills off plan to pay people to write good things about Internet Explorer

    It was only a couple days ago when Microsoft released its Internet Explorer Developer Channel, "a fully functioning browser designed to give Web developers and early adopters a sneak peek at the Web platform features we're working on." Any chance IE might have gotten some long-term social media love was dashed after a clueless "social strategist on behalf of Microsoft" invited the wrong person to write something positive about Internet Explorer.