Stories by Julie Sartain

  • Feds cracks down on data brokers

    J. Elizabeth Hill, a nurse living in San Diego, recently received a Gmail message from her nephew. Pasted inside was an article about soldiers in Afghanistan and the discrepancies regarding the ammunition they use.

  • How to protect your privacy on Google

    Under new privacy rules that Google is implementing on March 1, all of the data that Google collects based on your usage of YouTube, Gmail, Google+ and Google search will be aggregated into one user profile.

  • How to protect online transactions

    The trusty telephone is emerging as one of the key elements in new multifactor authentication schemes designed to protect online banking and other web-based financial transactions from rapidly evolving <a href="http://www.networkworld.com/topics/security.html">security</a> threats.

  • Is quantum computing real?

    Researchers have been working on quantum systems for more than a decade, in the hopes of developing super-tiny, super-powerful computers. And while there is still plenty of excitement surrounding quantum computing, significant roadblocks are causing some to question whether quantum computing will ever make it out of the lab.

  • 5 hot social networking sites

    The social networking scene is constantly in flux. The big 3 (Facebook, <a href="http://www.networkworld.com/slideshows/2010/052610-twitter-quiz.html">Twitter</a> and LinkedIn) are at the top of the heap right now. But challengers are springing up all the time, hoping to leverage the next big wave into a lucrative IPO.

  • Internet2 turns 15: Has it delivered on its promise?

    With nearly $100 million in new funding, Internet2, the faster, better Internet reserved for research and education, has embarked on an upgrade that will boost backbone capacity to a staggering 8.8Tbps and expand services to hundreds of thousands of libraries, schools and medical centers.

  • Motorola Droid X: Unique, or just another smartphone?

    On June 23, Motorola introduced the Droid, set for release this Thursday, calling it "a pocket-sized home theater." That's an interesting slogan for a phone. I can appreciate the feature, but how does it benefit the average worker? I can see the advantage for advertising agencies, multimedia firms, and maybe film critics, but what about the rest of the companies who just need a good, dependable phone?

  • Which Browser Is Best for Your Work?

    Net Market Share's recent Web browser statistics show Internet Explorer remaining the most popular, with 60 percent of the market share, which includes versions 6, 7, and 8. Firefox 3.6 comes in second at 24 percent, and Google's Chrome 5.0 is holding third place at 7 percent.

  • Five Helpful iPhone Apps for the Office

    Apple's iPhone has more than 200,000 applications in its library, and the list is growing. But with so many options, how do you decide which apps are relevant to your work? Obviously, no one has the time or money to download and review them all.

  • Toshiba Libretto W100 looks promising for mobile workers

    The new Toshiba Libretto W100 looks like an impressive system that will appeal to companies with workers in the field and on the road. It's a handy little device (7.95 x 4.84 x 1.2 inches weighing in at 1.8 pounds) that could easily replace many organizations' proprietary, custom-designed, hand-held systems.

  • NBA: Your last line of defense

    There's a new weapon in the security arsenal that monitors network traffic and issues real-time alerts when it spots unusual or suspicious behavior on the network.