Stories by Brian Nadel

  • Wireless docking with Toshiba's new Dynadock

    Anyone who's ever used a laptop docking station quickly sees the advantage of being able to plug into multiple peripherals (keyboard, mouse, large-screen monitor, USB drive, printer, etc.) with a single connection.

  • 17-in. laptops with big screens, low prices

    When most people think "laptop," they think of a device with a 12.1-to-15.4-in. screen, which is really a bit cramped for extended use. 17-in. notebooks, on the other hand, provide a nice, large, desktop-size display. And unlike desktop computers, they still allow some mobility.

  • Big changes coming to notebook design by 2015

    A lot has changed in the 20 years since the first laptop computers appeared, including gigahertz processors, color screens, optical drives and wireless data. However, one thing that has stubbornly stayed the same is the conventional clamshell format with its hinged display lid that opens to reveal a mechanical keyboard.

  • Should you put a Pre in your pocket?

    I have a confession to make: About two years ago I made a big mistake and bought a phone designed for mere mortals when what I really wanted was an Apple iPhone. Don't get me wrong -- my Sony Ericsson W580i has served me well -- but I'm ready to move up to a super-phone.

  • A buyer's guide to laptops -- from mighty mites to mobile monsters

    Whether you're buying for yourself or outfitting a department, shopping for a laptop today is a double-edged sword. The good news is that there's a huge variety to choose from, all with pros and cons. The bad news is that for many buyers there are just too many choices, leading to frustration and fatigue.

  • Mobile tech 2010: Trends that will change our lives

    The past two years have been exciting ones for mobility, with the dawn of netbooks, <a href="http://www.computerworld.com/action/article.do?command=viewArticleBasic&amp;articleId=9116844"> 4G communications </a> and the first smartphones without keypads. The next two should be just as attention-grabbing, if not more so, as a slew of new technologies make workers more productive on the road.

  • 3 tiny projectors light up the big screen

    Whether it's to clinch a sale, show off a new product or discuss a potential acquisition, the digital projector is major part of everyday corporate work. As a result, mobile workers who need to make presentations on the road have become beasts of burden, often hauling 20 to 25 pounds of gear, including notebook, projector, and a seemingly endless array of accessories, cables and adapters.

  • Three cheap business laptops

    The stock market's a mess, your company's balance sheet looks like a sea of red ink and your budget for outfitting 50 employees with new notebooks has been slashed to the bone. What's a poor buyer to do?

  • Great gadgets for the digital nomad

    When you're on the road, you can't call upon the resources that officebound employees enjoy. But whether your temporary workspace is a table at Starbucks, a hotel lobby, an airport or a client's lunchroom, you've still got to get the work done.

  • Wi-Fi tweaks for speed freaks

    One thing you can depend on these days is that the claims made for wireless routers, like 300Mbit/sec. throughput and 1,000-foot range, are nothing more than digital pipe dreams. The plain and simple truth is that these speeds and distances just aren't going to happen in your home, office or any place on this planet.

  • Tomorrow's mobile phones: Shape-shifters and more

    Look around at people talking on their mobile phones and, almost without exception, they are chatting on familiar-looking small rectangular boxes with glowing screens. However, this cookie-cutter approach to mobile phones will change dramatically in the next few years as phone designers get more daring and more personal.

  • Review: Satellite Pro notebook protects itself with faces instead of fingerprints

    It's not just fingerprints -- the shape, contours and lines of your face are also as unique as you are. Toshiba's Face Recognition software (which is available as a standard feature on the Satellite Pro U400, M300, A300 and P300 models) attempts to replace tedious passwords and uncertain finger swipes with identification gleaned from images of you smiling at your computer's webcam.

  • Meet the laptop you'll use in 2015

    A lot has changed in the 20 years since the first laptop computers appeared, including gigahertz processors, colour screens, optical drives and wireless data.

  • The future of mobile broadband has arrived -- in Korea

    The next time you're on the road and either can't find a Wi-Fi hot spot or it seems to take forever to download an important file via 3G, imagine you're in Seoul, South Korea. That's because Seoul's wireless WiBro network is nirvana for traveling professionals.

  • Hello, gorgeous! Meet the laptop you'll use in 2015

    A lot has changed in the 20 years since the first laptop computers appeared, including gigahertz processors, colour screens, optical drives and wireless data. However, one thing that has stubbornly stayed the same is the conventional clamshell format with its hinged display lid that opens to reveal a mechanical keyboard.