Finding a broadband provider frustrates consumers: Compare Broadband

Study finds 34 per cent of consumers get frustrated selecting a broadband service provider

Consumers are finding that picking a broadband service provider is the most frustrating part of buying a broadband plan, according to broadband comparison website, Compare Broadband.

In a recent study, which polled 716 respondents on its website,the company found that 34 per cent of consumers selected 'finding a provider in my area' as the number one cause for frustration when trying to find a plan.

Following this, confusing technical terms such as ADSL2+ and Wi-Fi, were major obstacles to a good customer experience for 24 per cent of the respondents, while another 24 per cent cited hidden costs as their main concern.

On the other hand, only 11 per cent of respondents mentioned that they felt frustration over the time it takes to set up a new service.

Compare Broadband spokesperson, Sarah McDonald, said trying to find a provider in some scenarios can be a very frustrating experience.

"In some places, Australians are spoiled for choice when it comes to picking a broadband provider. In areas of high competition, there is a good range of choice for all types of consumers – from cheap unlimited plans with Dodo to phone and broadband packages with Optus.

"But there are so many areas where there are no ports left, or there are limited providers offering plans, or the customer is so far away from the exchange, ADSL is not an option at all,” she said.

McDonald claimed that the problems sometimes lie with the telecommunications infrastructure in an area, with ISPs unable to connect some customers who are connected to a pair gain system, such as a RIM or CMUX. These make ADSL possible, but limit customers to a range of Telstra Wholesale products.

She also mentioned that in cases where consumers can find a provider in their area, they may find the plan they want to be more expensive because of a lack of network providers.

Compare Broadband expects these issues to be eliminated by the universal pricing and technology offered by the National Broadband Network, but until then, says many consumers will continue to face frustrations in finding a broadband plan.