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CeBit: There's more to Linux than Linux Alley

CeBit: There's more to Linux than Linux Alley

Attendees who want to see a handheld computer running Linux, for example, could seek out South Korean vendor Gmate to check out a device it calls Yopy. Yopy is expected to ship by mid-year, in both Korean and English-language versions.

Linux was also a big theme this year at Lotus Development's stand over in hall two. Lotus recently launched a version of its Domino software on a Linux platform.

To emphasise that, Lotus offered attendees the chance to pose with a life-size stuffed penguin, the official mascot of the operating system, under the motto "I've been seen with the penguin".

Meanwhile, over at SAP AG's mammoth exhibit, also in hall two, users could find a corner dedicated to Linux-based versions of the vendor's new Internet-based software, mySAP.com.

The scattered presence of Linux throughout the show floor is a sign that the operating system is gaining acceptance among corporations and users. The day when Linux is so widespread that a special pavilion won't be necessary, however, is more a wish of Linux advocates than a reality.

"A lot of people would like to see [a Linux pavilion] as not even needed, as Linux becomes more mainstream," said Jon "Maddog" Hall, executive director of Linux International, a non-profit association of Linux vendors.

Along Linux Alley, vendors are mainly showing their versions of the operating system and accompanying utilities.

Finnish Linux distributor SOT Finnish Software Engineering took the opportunity to launch its English-language version of Linux geared to the home-user market at CeBIT.

California-based TurboLinux, showing its enFuzion clustering technology, which links an existing network of computers running Linux, Unix or Microsoft's Windows to create one supercomputer. EnFuzion will be available starting March 1, and prices start at $US12,500 for the 32-node bundle. TurboLinux was also showing its most recent version of the operating system, TurboLinux Workstation and Turbo-Linux Server 6.0, which are currently available at $US49.95 and $199.95, respectively.

US-based Linux services com-pany Linuxcare announced that it would be opening its third European office, to be located in Hamburg.

The office will focus on services for independent software vendors (ISVs), application vendors and dot-com companies. The California-based company currently offers support for nine hardware platforms and 21 different versions of Linux.

Red Hat showed its current distribution, Red Hat Linux 6.1, and Caldera Systems showed its latest distribution as well. Caldera OpenLinux and Open Linux eServer 2.3 are both available now. German Linux Vendor SuSE Linux AG showed its current release as well.http://www.sot.comhttp://www.turbolinux.comhttp://www.linuxcare.comhttp://www.redhat.com


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