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Compaq to launch iPaq for LatAm in AprilThe rapid growth of Internet use among Latin American companies has prompted Compaq to launch its iPaq Internet-access device in the region, as well as a business unit devoted to the application service provider (ASP) market, Compaq executives announced at Microsoft's recent Latin America Enterprise Solutions Conference 2000.

The iPaq, whose price begins at $US499, not including local country tariffs and custom surcharges, is a device designed to let users at mid-sized and large companies access the Internet, said Enrico Pesatori, Compaq's senior vice president and general manager of the enterprise service and solutions group. The product will begin shipping in Latin America in April. Compaq unveiled iPaq in the US in November 1999.

As it is doing worldwide, Compaq will target ASPs in Latin America with an offering of products, services, financing options and marketing programs, as the vendor believes this market will grow very fast in the region, Pesatori said.

Adobe opens online store in Japan

Adobe Systems has expanded its online storefront with the opening of a new Web site dedicated to customers in Japan.

The new site, www.abode.co.jp/store , enables customers in Japan to order either Japanese or English-language versions of the company's software. Previously, customers in Japan were forced to use the US-based Web store which meant an English-language environment and dollar-based prices.

The Japan online store offers both Japanese and English versions of Photoshop, Illustrator, GoLive and Acrobat, and to promote the new site offers free shipping on orders received before the end of April.

Piracy on the PCs

The Business Soft-ware Alliance claims software piracy cost the IT industry $US11 billion in 1998, highlighting the ongoing problem of unlicenced software.

The culprits are not just kids trading computer games but also companies and agencies. According to the US Department of Defence (DOD) Inspector General, up to half of the PCs in DOD may have copyrighted software loaded on them without documentation to prove that the software was legally acquired. By 1998, the problem had grown so significant that President Clinton issued an executive order requiring agencies to ensure that all their software had been purchased and used only in accordance with applicable copyright laws, the alliance reports.


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