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PC Solutions Briefs

PC Solutions Briefs

AMD finalises sale of communications divisionAdvanced Micro Devices has announced that it has completed the sale of most of its communication products division for about $US375 million in cash.

AMD announced in May that it had agreed to sell 90 per cent of the 160-person division to investment firm Francisco Partners. The new entity will do business under the name of Legerity.

AMD retained a 10 per cent stake in the business, with an option to acquire approximately 10 per cent more, the company said in a statement.

The chip maker has said it sold the division to focus more on PC microprocessors, memory chips and related products.

Palm in good hands

Sydney-based Advanced Portable Technologies (APT) has been appointed the Australian distributor of Rhinoskin's range of protective cases for Palm PDAs.

APT, which also provides case and stylus solutions for a range of handheld devices and digital cameras, will distribute the Titanium Slider Hardcase and Aluminium Hardcase.

Designed for Palm Vs, the titanium case retails for $199, while the aluminium case retails at $159, including GST.

Rambus DRAM breaks 1GHz barrier

Rambus has announced a design breakthrough that allows DRAM chips to transfer data at speeds higher than 1GHz. Rambus said the chip would be marketed for "leading-edge applications" such as communications and graphics systems, along with consumer products such as video game consoles.

The chip is also designed to increase speed for high-end processors such as the upcoming Pentium 4.

The 1066MHz Rambus DRAM, or RDRAM, can move memory to a processor chip a third faster than the 800MHz chip Rambus unveiled in June. The chip can transfer data twice per processor clock cycle, setting maximum throughput at 2.1GHz. No ship dates or pricing were given.

IBM cuts NetVista prices

IBM has slashed, by 14 per cent, the prices of its NetVista thin clients, which have been on the market less than a year. NetVista thin clients offer simplified, server-to-client computing for deployments that do not require a fully functional PC, such as a retail checkout terminal. Although IBM officials report brisk sales of the units, Roger Kay, an analyst at IDC, said thin-client computing is experiencing slow adoption rates, due to closed networking requirements.


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