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M2M sees opportunities with Bluetooth

M2M sees opportunities with Bluetooth

Wireless distributor, Machine to Machine (M2M), is claiming its exclusive Australian distributor deal with Swedish Bluetooth vendor, ConnectBlue, will give the local mobile developer community access to a new alternative to Wi-Fi and cellular link technologies.

M2M director, Daryl Chambers, said wireless technology providers had been asking for a product which could provide short links of up to 100 metres between communications equipment.

While admitting that interaction between Bluetooth devices in the general market continued to be plagued by compatibility issues, Chambers said there was a market opportunity in using the technology as a communications pipe.

"If you're building the applications with Bluetooth built into it, you pick up on all of those potential problems," he said.

"The Bluetooth headset concept gives the technology a bad name. We're not looking for applications where anyone can connect to anyone else."

By contrast, Bluetooth was a fantastic technology if used as an alternative to running cable between two communication devices or machinery within a warehouse for example, Chambers said.

"There are opportunities for Bluetooth in wireless telemetry," he said. "It's hard to hack, and it does the job. Wi-Fi is cheaper, but it's easier to hack."

M2M distributes a range of wireless and cellular products from Sony Ericsson and Kyocera, including CDMA and GSM-based modules, fixed wireless terminals and communications accessories.

As part of the new deal, M2M will distribute ConnectBlue's full range of Bluetooth hardware, including its Bluetooth Serial modem and OEM Serial Port Adapter.

M2M would first launch the ConnectBlue range of products to its 400-strong mobile developer partner base, Chambers said. It would then look to expand into industrial sectors, such as manufacturing.

He said M2M had already held discussions with sports training institutes, as well as users interested in implementing the technology into ruggedised computers for specific environments, such as on yachts.


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