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Telstra's net backbone stands up to traffic surge

Telstra's net backbone stands up to traffic surge

Despite a big increase in internet traffic as a result of the Games, Telstra's communications backbone appears to be handling the demand.

John Hunter, general manager Sydney 2000 Olympics for Telstra, claims the influx in IP traffic has made little more than a splash in the Big Pond of pipes running out of Australia.

"Obviously there has been a major increase in traffic but you have to put that in perspective. It's really relatively small in comparison to the rest of IP traffic going in and out of Australia," Hunter said. "It's a blip on the radar."

With myriad sites trying to cash in on hit-happy Olympics web surfers, Hunter said the additional capacity assigned by Telstra to international IP traffic is in line with the current demand. "The network is running well," he added.

Meanwhile, one of the big network issues keeping Telstra engineers on their toes, Hunter said, is the high level of telephony and video transmissions currently running across the network.

Telstra has set up more than 10 times its usual number of video circuits to cater for the large volume of transmissions from the world's media and television stations covering the Games.

"We've got 500 video circuits to ensure dedicated delivery (of signal)," said Hunter. That's a lot considering Telstra was catering for around 40 before the start of the Olympics.


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