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Enterprise Solutions Briefs: HDS, Troika, Seagate, Oxford

Enterprise Solutions Briefs: HDS, Troika, Seagate, Oxford

HDS and Troika sign agreement

Hitachi Data Systems (HDS) and privately owned Troika Networks have signed a partnership that will see the advent of HDS OEM Troika's storage products.

HDS will rebadge Troika's Zentai Controller for server and SAN systems as part of HDS's Freedom Data Network product range.

The Troika Fiber Channel interface links servers and storage devices and will be bundled with HDS's Lightning 9900 system, as well as Freedom Storage 7700E and 5800 systems.

Pricing and availability are yet to be announced.

Seagate drives new disk

Storage vendor Seagate Technology is expected to bring its latest low-cost disk drive to market imminently for entry-level servers and PCs.

The vendor will release its Barracuda 36ES SCSI drive with a capacity of 18 to 36GBs, and a throughput of 160MBs.

Seagate is after the SME market, where price is the main purchasing concern, and is targeting bandwidth-intensive applications conducted on workstations such as personal video, computer-aided design, computer-aided manufacturing and multimedia.

Suggested retail price is $US319 (for 18GB capacity) and $519 (for 36GB capacity), but Australian pricing will vary subject to Seagate-authorised resellers. The Barracuda 36ES will be in volume production by the end of the year.

Oxford outsources IT

US-based Oxford Health Plans, which suffered multimillion-dollar losses in 1997 and 1998 after a botched systems upgrade, plans to outsource most of its IT operations starting next year, according to sources inside the company.

The decision to hire CSC in a five-year deal - estimated to be worth a total of $270 to $330 million - came after Oxford officials spent seven months evaluating outsourcing proposals from CSC, Entex Consulting Services and IBM, the sources said.

Oxford confirmed plans to outsource its helpdesk and desktop support operations, while sources suggest the outsourcing plan also includes the company's data centre operations, network operations, telecommunications and server support.

The IT group at Oxford has been on a roller coaster since making a difficult migration in 1996 to a new set of homegrown applications for managing membership and processing claims. The software miscalculated payments, underestimated costs and overestimated the company's income by $392 million.


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