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PC Briefs: Sun, HyperTransport

PC Briefs: Sun, HyperTransport

Sun discontinuing Intel-based server

Sun Microsystems will stop selling its LX50 server, the company’s first general purpose Intel x86-based server, on October 16. A Sun statement said the decision to announce “end of life” for the LX50 was “a natural progression in the lifecycle of its product line”. “The [Intel-based] V60x and V65x are the next offerings in a continually broadening low-end x86 portfolio in addition to its large in SPARC/Solaris low-end offerings,” Sun said. An analyst said he was not surprised by the discontinuance, noting that Sun had released other Intel-based hardware since introducing the LX50. “Products get replaced in a fairly regular cycle, particularly when you’re talking about Intel processor-based systems,” senior analyst at Illuminata, Gordon Haff, said.

IBM and six others join HyperTransport consortium

Seven companies have added their names to the list of backers of the HyperTransport interconnect standard, including IBM, Texas Instruments, and EMC. HyperTransport is a standard for linking chips such as the central processing unit (CPU) and the memory in a system. The standard increases the speed at which data can be moved around the chip, and reduces the number of buses required to handle those links. AMD, a founding member of the HyperTransport Technology Consortium, uses HyperTransport in its Opteron server chip to integrate the memory controller and CPU. The technology has been credited by analysts and reviewers as one of the main factors behind Opteron’s competitive performance. HyperTransport is used in Apple’s PowerMac G5. LTX, Media Fusion, National Semiconductor and Network Appliance also joined the consortium last week.


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