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Editorial: This is tomorrow calling

Editorial: This is tomorrow calling

In human years turning 12 may mean the slightly disturbing onset of pubescent pimple attacks, but in publishing years, being 12 is more akin to a woman turning 40. The effortless sex appeal of a newcomer to the dating game is behind you, the confidence that comes with maturity has set in, but the market pressure to do away with an occasional character revealing frown-line is nevertheless hard to escape. Yep, it ain’t easy keeping up with the pressures of growing up, but I’d like to think that here at ARN we’ve done a pretty good job of it.

At 12, we are coming to you with considerably less teenage angst and considerably more relaxed maturity — and we’re hoping that it shows. As you have probably noticed, this week we introduce a new, more contemporary, look and feel to your weekly staple of channel intelligence. The new design reflects our desire to minimise the sensory clutter and maximise the value of what we are here to deliver — information, by making it more accessible and easier to read and locate.

While on the topic of rejuvenation and reinvention, two things caught my eye last week — the official birth of the second generation Internet — the grid, and the frantic movement to come up with what will undoubtedly be the next killer app for the industry — the anti-spam solution.

Things may not be on the up at this very moment (although increases in both consumer and reseller spending have been reported across the IT spectrum), but both events could provide a much needed direction for the industry not quite sure what, why or to whom it is selling these days.

The usual IT hype aside, there are some tangible benefits and almost infinite possibilities for those exploring the two paths. On the one hand, there’s the grid, with its almost unlimited potential to multiply data processing power. It may have only 10 connection points at this stage, but by 2007 it is expected that 100,000 PCs will be connected to it. Think of the Internet and its 10-year growth from 130 to 35 million servers servicing its content, think of the number of PCs, modems, printers and scanners that were sold to play with this content — and then think services, wireless, broadband …

Well, the grid moves things one step ahead. It really does create a virtual world of its own — the world where one entity feeds off the power of another and both of them connect into a power-sharing network that could give birth to an even bigger, faster, and more pervasive Matrix-type reality. Yeah, baby! The IT’s got its mojo back. Now if we could only work out what services to sell with it, the time of overvalued IPOs will be back before we know it. But while we’re waiting, is anyone out there — bar Sean Howard — working on this anti-spam thing? Whoever you are, you hold the key to the IT’s next magic pill!

You may not believe me, but I am becoming desolate at the thought of having to sort through hundreds of daily, unsolicited, asinine electronic “business” proposals offering to increase my penis size.

Bar the obvious anatomic difficulties, the only thing I would love more than to increase the power of my non-existent dangly bits, is your phone number.

Not because I want to know when your IPO is coming up, but because I need someone to take the darn spam thing away. For while legislators keep legislating and my ISP recommends that I download some filtering software off the Web, all I want is a software to scare the living daylights out of the Internet and email-loving traders in human anatomy spamming me on a daily basis.

You and Sean Howard seem to be the only two willing to stop them, and Howard’s got a private number. So, sorry if I sound desperate, but can you please give me a call.


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