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SCO revokes AIX license

SCO revokes AIX license

Escalating its $US1 billion March lawsuit against IBM, The SCO Group has terminated IBM's right to distribute its AIX Unix operating system and claimed that it was now entitled to a portion of IBM's total Unix revenue.

In addition to the $US1 billion in damages SCO is seeking for revenue lost to Linux, the company is now also seeking compensation from IBM for AIX-related hardware, services and software that it ships. "Starting Friday [June] the 13th and going forward, the IBM revenue stream that ties to AIX, we're going to make a claim on that revenue stream, based on the fact that they don't have an authorised version of AIX to ship," SCO chief executive officer, Darl McBride, said.

"We have the contract rights to terminate their use of the software in the marketplace or their ability to distribute their software in the marketplace," McBride said.

SCO sued IBM in March, charging the company with misappropriation of trade secrets, unfair competition and other illegal actions, alleging that IBM is trying to damage Unix to benefit its Linux business.

The company had given IBM 100 days to come to an agreement, an ultimatum that ended last Friday.

IBM has denied any wrongdoing in the case and, on Monday, disputed SCO's right to revoke its AIX license.

"SCO continues to make claims," IBM spokesperson said. "Our license is irrevocable. It's perpetual, and it cannot be terminated."

Because it has terminated the AIX contract, SCO now claims that AIX users "don't have the right to use the software, and IBM doesn't have the right to distribute or sell the software," McBride said.

Though McBride seemed to say that AIX users no longer had the right to use AIX, he stopped short of saying that they might be targets in the lawsuit. "We're not commenting on what they should do directly," he said. "We're saying that this is between us and IBM."


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