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Data turns to dollars as Aussie organisations chase analytics expertise

Data turns to dollars as Aussie organisations chase analytics expertise

Following years of industry hype, the local market is widely expected to turn data demand into dollars for the channel

Australian businesses are expected to increase adoption of big data and analytics technologies in 2018, providing new opportunities for partners specialising in providing data-driven expertise.

Following years of industry hype, the local market is widely expected to turn data demand into dollars for the channel, as organisations give investment on analytics a boost in a bid to better-use the data that has been captured and maintained.

According to IDC findings, 41 per cent of businesses in Australia have already deployed big data analytics initiatives in some capacity, with 50 per cent of organisations expected to increase investment during the next 12 months.

“This indicates adoption is going to pick up, and utilisation will expand,” IDC senior market analyst John Feng said. “To add in a bit of context, cloud deployment models, which is another hot topic among IT executives, has a rate of 48 per cent that will increase investment on it.

“On the top spot we have infrastructure and security software, on which 53 per cent will increase investment in next 12 months.

"Not surprising for the relatively more matured Australian market, where compliance and governance cannot be stressed enough.”

Collectively, Feng said the proliferation of data-generating sensors, the declining unit price of storage, the interconnectivity of endpoints, the adoption of cloud and the development of the digital economy, have enabled the collection of a rich amount of data in almost all aspects of business and production activities.

“The amount and breadth of accumulated data has reached the point where it can be utilised to aid in running the business,” Feng added.

Looking ahead, Feng said the emergence of new tech buyers - such as line-of-business leaders - will drive demand for big data analytics, bolstered by end-user demand for clearer insights, the development of edge computing and the flexibility of cloud consumption models.

“To take advantage of the demand for data analytics, vendors must ensure the data generated is ready for aggregated analysis and automatic processing,” Feng explained.

“From a solution point of view, capability to integrate with multiple data sources and perform real-time, reiterative business-specific analytics that feeds back to the production process will be very appealing to end users.

“Customers will be demanding analytics capabilities that can provide a simple, flexible, unified view of multiple data sources that ultimately lead to measurable business outcome.”

For Feng, data analytics is expected to move from retrospective business reporting to be more and more involved in timely, forward-looking business decision-making.

“Its implementation will be in different stages as customers go through the journey of becoming a data-driven business,” he added.

“Ultimately, data analytics, coupled with automation, will empower an organisation to be more efficient and better adapt to the faster pace of change in the digital world.”


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Tags analyticsdataIDCbig data

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