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NEC set for hiring spree after Aussie cyber security centre launch

NEC set for hiring spree after Aussie cyber security centre launch

The company expects to take on 50 new high-skilled employees

NEC Australia sales and solutions director, Andy Hurt (L) and South Australia's Minister for Investment and Trade, Martin Hamilton-Smith (R). (NEC)

NEC Australia sales and solutions director, Andy Hurt (L) and South Australia's Minister for Investment and Trade, Martin Hamilton-Smith (R). (NEC)

NEC Australia is set to undertake a local employment drive following the official opening of its multimillion-dollar Cyber Security Centre in Adelaide on 31 May.

The company first announced plans in June last year to establish its new Global Security Intel Centre (GSIC) in Adelaide. At the time, it was made clear that the centre would give rise to around 50 new highly-skilled jobs over a five-year period.

Now, with the centre up and running, the company plans to make good on its promise to hire dozens of highly-skilled workers to fill out its ranks in the Adelaide operation’s offices over the coming months and years.

“NEC’s investment will help South Australia achieve global prominence in the cyber security field, and complement the Smart City initiatives already underway in Adelaide,” South Australia’s Minister for Investment and Trade Martin Hamilton-Smith said.

While also forming part of NEC’s global cybersecurity network, the new centre is aimed at complementing the company’s security-focused facilities and networks in Japan, Brazil, Singapore, USA and Austria.

“This isn’t just about the creation of 50 new high-value jobs in South Australia over the next five years - this is a major global investment in a growth sector,” NEC Australia chief operating officer, Mike Barber, said.

“We see the cyber security demand in Australia and the Asia Pacific Region as a huge opportunity aligning with the company’s global vision,” he said.

The GSIC facility is anticipated to help enable the adoption of new, more efficient business models that translate into new opportunities.

“Cyber security is a rapidly growing sector, and is attracting increasing attention and investment,” Hamilton-Smith said in June last year, when the proposed centre was first announced.

“Governments and businesses alike need innovative products and services to protect them from increasingly sophisticated threats to privacy and security.

“It also means the creation of highly-specialised jobs in an area that will be transformational for the local economy,” he said at the time.

NEC has a long history with the South Australian Government. In late 2014, the company picked up a three-year, $69.8 million contract to manage, maintain and support the central and local data networks of all South Australian Government agencies.

Likewise, the opening of the new centre comes almost a year after NEC Australia was awarded a $780,000 contract by SA Police to develop facial recognition software.

NEC’s graduate program is also understood to be providing pathways for local technology students to enter the workforce and build a career with the company.

This program is a key component of attracting graduates who will be located in the Adelaide office, the South Australian Government said.

The facility builds on NEC Australia's memorandum of understanding with the University of Adelaide’s Smart City initiative, under which the organisations will collaborate closely on research and development.


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Tags NECcybersecurityadelaideSouth Australia

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