Menu
Govt injects $37 million in Advanced Network project

Govt injects $37 million in Advanced Network project

The Federal Government is throwing $37 million into an advanced national networking backbone and new broadband wireless project, in an effort to get Australia back into the technology innovation race.

When added to the contributions by consortium members this latest injection will raise the total cash investment of the Building on IT Strengths (BITS) Advanced Networks Program to $130 million.

Divided into segments, the project has been shared out between three successful applicants, with grants being funded by the partial sale of Telstra.

"As well as connecting research institutions, overseas experience has shown that advanced networks boost industry development - new applications, products and services in such areas as telemedicine, bio-informatics simulation software, advanced manufacturing and online education," Senator Richard Alston, Federal M0inister for Communications, Information Technology and the Arts said.

Centre for Networking Technologies for Information Economy (CeNTIE) - a CSIRO-led consortium including Nortel Networks, Amcom Telecommunications, the UNSW, UTS and the WA Interactive Virtual Environments Centre (IVEC), was granted $14 million dollars to build a nation-wide optical fibre backbone research network coupled with a broadband metropolitan area network in Sydney and Perth. CeNTIE is focussing on the areas of health, multimedia, and information brokering.

GrangeNet - a conglomerate of AARNet, the Australian Partnership for Advanced Computing (APAC), the CRC for Enterprise Distributed Systems Technology, Cisco and PowerTel, was likewise granted $14 million to establish four main nodes in Brisbane, Canberra, Sydney and Melbourne. The network is designed to support research communities requiring significant levels of bandwidth, including computational physics, astronomy, bio-informatics and remote sensing.mNet Australia - a partnership between Adelaide University, Agile Pty Ltd, DSpace, the Playford Centre, Telstra, the City of Adelaide and the University of South Australia - has been granted $9 million to build wireless LANs and pre-commercial 3G mobile networks concentrated in Adelaide's North Terrace precinct. There will also be a regional hub at Whyalla to explore the remote delivery of services and inter-operability between separated networks. mNet targets development in the tourism, health, film, TV and new media, education and transport sectors.

Advanced Network Players:

- Centre for Networking Technologies for Information Economy (CeNTIE), $14 millionA CSIRO-led consortium including Nortel Networks, Amcom Telecommunications, the UNSW, UTS and the WA Interactive Virtual Environments Centre (IVEC), will build a nation wide optical fibre backbone research network coupled with a broadband metropolitan area network in Sydney and Perth. CeNTIE is focussing on the areas of health, multimedia, and information brokering.

- GrangeNet, $9 million

An alliance of AARNet, the Australian Partnership for Advanced Computing (APAC), the CRC for Enterprise Distributed Systems Technology, Cisco and PowerTel, plans to establish four main nodes in Brisbane, Canberra, Sydney and Melbourne. The network is designed to support research communities requiring significant levels of bandwidth, including computational physics, astronomy, bio-informatics and remote sensing.

- mNet Australia, $14 million

A partnership between Adelaide University, Agile Pty Ltd, DSpace, the Playford Centre, Telstra, the City of Adelaide and the University of South Australia, has been granted $9 million to build wireless LANs and pre-commercial 3G mobile networks concentrated in Adelaide's North Terrace precinct. There will also be a regional hub at Whyalla to explore the remote delivery of services and interoperability between separated networks. mNet targets development in the tourism, health, film TV and new media, education and transport sectors.


Follow Us

Join the newsletter!

Error: Please check your email address.
Show Comments