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EXCLUSIVE - JAPAN 2012, Pt 4: Flexibility was key concept behind HUS’ evolution, says Hitachi

EXCLUSIVE - JAPAN 2012, Pt 4: Flexibility was key concept behind HUS’ evolution, says Hitachi

Storage vendor shares the design concept behind its new unified storage platform

Hitachi IT platform business strategy and planning operation general manager, Akinobu Shimada.

Hitachi IT platform business strategy and planning operation general manager, Akinobu Shimada.

In April, Hitachi Data Systems (HDS) launched its new Hitachi Unified Storage (HUS) platform in Australia.

While it was clear that it was a big release for the vendor locally, it was also a big moment for Hitachi worldwide, as HUS was the first large update to the vendor’s platform in numerous years.

As to why HDS’ storage platform underwent a significant transformation, Hitachi IT platform business strategy and planning operation general manager, Akinobu Shimada, attributes it to making storage more streamlined.

“Hitachi and HDS’ unified storage concept is to consolidate and centrally manage block, file and object data on a single platform,” he said.

Although HUS is naturally in the spotlight due to its recent debut, Shimada points out that the entire hardware product portfolio, including HUS, will be supported by Hitachi’s Command Suite management software.

When speaking about the timing of HUS, Shimada says that it was released now in order for the vendor to be “first to market” with what they consider to be a “true” enterprise-class unified storage solution.

“We aim to help customers utilise their big data effectively, and HUS does that by addressing the most pressing challenges our customers are facing today,” he said.

“Namely, dealing with growth, managing costs, and handling complexity.”

One of the key proponents behind the development of the HUS platform architecture would be that it would flexible.

According to Shimada, this is because Hitachi recognised that it is important for customers to help them manage their critical business applications and meet their growth requirements without compromising performance, scalability or cost efficiency.

“So in order for HUS to meet these needs, the flexibility of the platform’s architecture was important,” he said.

As HUS follows after Hitachi’s longstanding Adaptable Modular Storage 2000 series, Shimada says that it improves in a lot of areas of its predecessor.

“HUS provides higher performance, more storage scalability, enhanced memory management features, and a comparable starting price,” he said.

“It also supports file, block and object data to enable more flexibility, versatility and simplification in unified storage for our customers.”

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