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Mainframes to be up and virtualisation management down in 2012: CA Technologies

Mainframes to be up and virtualisation management down in 2012: CA Technologies

CA Technologies Strategic Solutions VP, Andi Mann, looks into his crystal ball for 2012

Virtualisation and the Cloud may have been big in 2011, but bigger and better things are in store for 2012, according to CA Technologies Strategic Solutions VP, Andi Mann.

In addition to being convinced that we are not yet living a ‘post-PC' world, Mann feels that the advent of the ‘post-mainframe' world has yet to come.

“Cloud will not kill datacentres, virtual will not kill physical, tablets will not kill PCs, Mac will not kill Windows, Android will not kill iOS, and streaming will not kill DVDs,” he said.

While Mann admits that brands may come and go, he is convinced that “no technology will die” and instead our choices are expanding, so we need to be ready to manage “an ever-increasing selection of technologies” in the public and private spaces.

Hybrid Cloud might have been the buzz word of 2011, but Mann considers it a bit of a misnomer as businesses “expect hybrid IT” in this new “world of choices”.

“Business will also expect IT to make them work together, whether IT owns the service or not,” he explained.

“IT must act as a trusted advisor, as a service broker, and as quality assurance for this brave new world of complex hybrid IT.”

With the proliferation of hybrid IT, business owners will realise in 2012 that what they really want is for the technology to work and not waste time managing it.

As a result, Mann expecta service quality with hybrid IT will become a key area in 2012, as well as the expectation by consumers that IT will eliminate blind spots, actively support an explosion of devices, managing complex cross-boundary services, and provide all-encompassing service assurance for the entire end-user experience.

Based on the results of this year's Longhaus research from Australia, public Cloud adoption is expected to slow this year after a good run with the early adopter market.

“Issues, perceived or real, with security, compliance, service quality, skills, staffing, complexity, and good old politics will all put the brakes on,” Mann explained.

While Mann is unsure whether the “Cloud stall” will be comparable to the past “virtual stall”, he does foresee a marked slowdown in public Cloud adoption this year.

With many, if not most, enterprise decision makers being wary of the public Cloud, it will be up to vendors to do a better job of deploying and explaining Cloud security in 2012.

As organisations increasingly adopt more feature packed Cloud-oriented security solutions, Mann expects that CIOs will warm up to the Cloud as they start to view security as less of a barrier.

Mainframe is also not dead, according to Mann, and this year will instead see the rise of the legacy technology as a Cloud platform.

“Massively scalable, hosting critical big data, capable of running complex Cloud workloads on a variety of architectures, mainframe is really an obvious Cloud platform,” he said.

Large enterprises and governments are expected to leverage their investments and bring mainframes into their Cloud mix, though it is not expected to replace “commodity Clouds.”

Mann’s other predictions for 2012 includes public Cloud providers to start offering UNIX and other non-x86 platforms, while deployment of integrated fabrics like Cisco UCS and VCE Vblock will experience a growth spurt this year.

“Most large enterprises are heavily dependent on heterogeneous systems for their mission-critical applications,” he explained.

“Despite the common myth that Cloud equals commodity servers, heterogeneous servers will start to become more available for large enterprise deployments.”

Commodity Cloud vendors are also expected to take management of the technology seriously as enterprises and governments demand it more, while virtualisation management becomes increasingly irrelevant as people turn to hybrid IT management to save costs and time.

“Maybe 2012 is not the end of virtualisation management,” Mann said, “but it is going to be the start of the demise.”


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