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IT employment expectations positive despite global economic uncertainty

IT employment expectations positive despite global economic uncertainty

In the IT sector, 39.7 per cent of managers intend to increase permanent headcount next quarter

Australian IT managers appear optimistic about IT employment expectations regardless of extensive negative international sentiment, according to the latest report by recruitment company, Hudson.

Hudson’s latest Employment Expectations report showed 48.1 per cent of hiring managers intend to increase their permanent headcount in the next three months.

In the IT sector, a net of 39.7 per cent of managers intend to increase permanent headcount over the next quarter.

The IT sector remains the third most confident industry in Australia, following resources and professional services.

The survey, conducted in late December, mirrors the views of 4338 employers across Australia that despite the current economic conditions, most sectors report positive employment outlooks led by a forceful resources sector.

The only industry that slipped in its expectations is national employment.

For the quarter January to March 2012, it dropped 2.2 percentage points (pp) to net 25.7 per cent, compared to the previous quarter of 27.9 per cent.

In the IT sector, following a number of quarters of consistent growth, 43.6 per cent of surveyed employers in IT are expecting to maintain a steady headcount over the same period.

However, IT employment expectation figures have weakened slightly, dipping 3.0pp compared to those for the last quarter.

“A number of specialist skills are still in high demand as employers look to replace IT skills lost from cutbacks made during the global financial crisis. Candidates who have technology expertise and project management skills are in particularly high demand,” Hudson ICT national practice director, Martin Retschko, said.

Within the specific Australian states, IT employer sentiment in Queensland was the strongest – with a net 50.0 per cent of hiring managers intending to increase the number of permanent employees in the first quarter of 2012.

Victoria followed behind with a net 45.2 per cent.

A dip occurred in the ACT, where confidence slipped 12.8pp over the quarter to a net 42.0 per cent.

Hudson attributed it to the Federal Government cutting $20 billion from government revenues and increased scrutiny of capital expenditure for the current year.

“Now more than ever, in a turbulent economic climate, the cost of a bad hire is crippling. It is essential that employers have a robust process in place to rigorously assess and secure the best people for their businesses,” Retschko added. More to follow.


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