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ICT workers clocking up the hours

ICT workers clocking up the hours

New survey finds ICT industry workers are putting in more than 40 hours per week

The number of ICT professionals working more than 40 hours per week has jumped to 74.9 per cent, up from 65 per cent previously, according to a new report.

The Australian Computer Society (ACS) 2011 Information and Communications Technology Employment Survey, revealed unemployment rates experienced minimal change since 2009, but the average workload has increased.

ACS CEO Alan Patterson said the increase in working hours, which are above the prescribed working week of 35 hours, could be partly attributed to people trying to ensure job security.

More than a third (36.4 per cent) of respondents claimed they had worked more than 45 hours per week and a further 21.3 per cent reported working 50 or more hours per week compared to the 10 per cent figure recorded in 2009.

“Regardless of the varying economic conditions, we’ve seen minimal change in unemployment rates. In spite of this, professionals are working longer hours indicating an increased demand for ICT skill sets,” Patterson said.

Meanwhile, the number of people working full time has risen to 82.9 per cent since 2009 (76.15 per cent), spurring a decrease in part-time employment from 7.34 per cent in 2009 to 3.1 per cent in 2011.

ICT professionals aged 35-44 reported the lowest incidence of unemployment in the preceding 12 months at 6.5 per cent. In contrast, survey respondents aged under 25 had the highest number of unemployment in the previous 12 months.

“Given Australia’s current ICT skills shortage, it is important that graduates are given the opportunity to progress within the industry. High school and university students who are considering a career in ICT should also feel confident in the opportunities on offer. A vital part of addressing current skills shortages is to position the profession as a rewarding career path with many directions,” ACS president, Anthony Wong, said.


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