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Intel: IPTV a potentially disruptive technology

Intel: IPTV a potentially disruptive technology

Internet TV will change the game for content providers in Australia, according to the chipmaker’s local general manager.

IPTV is slowly gaining momentum in Australia and it has the potential to completely change the way the broadcast industry operates in Australia, according to Intel general manager, Philip Cronin.

Speaking at an American Chamber of Commerce lunch, he singled out IPTV, or Internet TV as a potentially “disruptive technology” particularly in countries like Australia.

Disruptive technology refers to technological advancements that can interrupt current planning processes for various industries.

“Australia is dominated by free to air and a whole series of rules and regulations [relating to the delivery of content],” Cronin said. “What we tend to forget is the TV is the biggest piece of glass in your home besides windows and it is not connected to the Internet.”

Some TV vendors such as Samsung and LG have recently made a push into making Internet connected TVs.

Both companies have enlisted a swathe of content providers such as Yahoo!7 and Telstra’s BigPond for Internet streamed services such as catch-up TV and movies on demand.

All these services are aimed at meeting demands for more flexible content viewing in a climate where TV ratings have fallen dramatically.

The restricted nature of content delivery has also been named as a contributor to increased movie piracy.

The IPTV trend will continue to drive innovation and change in the broadcast and television industry, Cronin said.

“It’s not about connecting to the Internet and searching, it is about being entertained, about content and how you will be the owner of the content," Cronin said.

ISPs such as iiNet and Telstra already offer IPTV services in Australia.


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Tags IPTVPhilip Croninmobile solutionsiiNetinternet tvYahoo!7intelTelstrabigpond

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