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PC Solutions Briefs: IBM, Apacer, Bits, Sharp

PC Solutions Briefs: IBM, Apacer, Bits, Sharp

Big Blue walks Apacer down memory lane

As the memory component battle continues to rage, manufacturer Apacer has announced it will work with IBM to bring its double data rate (DDR) memory to market.

Under the deal, Taiwan-based Apacer will coordinate customer testing of systems using the DDR memory by providing third-party vendors with Apacer memory modules using IBM's 128MB and 256MB memory devices. Vendors will be able to test system components with the modules for compatibility issues.

DDR memory is primarily used in servers and workstations. According to the company, the modules offer twice the data rate bandwidth of conventional PC100 or PC133 SDRAM memory but at "near compatible pricing structures".

Bits hails launch of FireSCSI adapter

Computer graphics distributor Bits has announced the availability of Microtech International's FireSCSI Xpress.

The adapter allows both legacy and new SCSI peripherals to be attached to the FireWire port of a Macintosh or PC. It combines high-speed data transfer and the plug and play features of FireWire technology with an SCSI interface. Users connect the adapter to an SCSI device and plug it into the FireWire port of their computer. The adapter will retail for $230 and provides a data transfer rate of up to 5MB per second and 10MB per second in asynchronous and synchronous mode respectively.

Sharp debuts Windows tablet PC

Sharp announced in Japan last week a new Windows-based tablet-type personal computer aimed at business applications.

Based on an Intel Pentium II 266MHz processor, the RW-A230 "Copernicus" tablet is aimed at jobs such as data entry, as a database access terminal, a display terminal or as a basic mobile terminal for workers on the road. At just 925 grams, the machine is easy to carry and its 8.4 inch touch-panel thin film transistor (TFT) liquid crystal display (LCD) screen means there is no need for a keyboard.

A special feature of the machine is the hot swap battery mode which allows the standard two-hour battery pack to be changed without the machine being switched off. Other features include 64MB of main memory, a 6GB hard disk drive, PC Card and Compact Flash card slots, a built-in speaker, a USB interface and an infrared port.

Sharp said it plans to put the device on sale overseas under a different name although the company has no definite timeframe at present.


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