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NOTES FROM THE FIELD: Master of his domain

NOTES FROM THE FIELD: Master of his domain

This little puppy Apache is growing fast. Airedales being new to me, I thought the pup was big already, but Amber tells me he will get much bigger. "I love the big dogs," she said.

The harder they fall

The biggest support for Java in the end-user community comes from the financial sector, and now Microsoft is aggressively targeting that community with .Net. According to one of my spies, Merrill Lynch is about to crack in Microsoft's favour, and as goes Merrill so goes the rest of the financial IT community. If that happens, the entire Java community is in for a lot of pain.

Looking to compete fiercely with Microsoft in the programmer trenches, BEA Systems just prior to its recent user conference came within a hair's breadth of buying WebGain to get an application development tool that would complement Cajun.

Never trust anybody

VeriSign, the purveyor of trust, is losing that very trust among its domain name customers. Ever since VeriSign started selling "back-ordered" domain names, my spy keeps running into names that expired long ago and have even been removed from Whois databases, but which still keep showing up as "back-orderable", according to VeriSign. The way my spy calls it, VeriSign is keeping fake reservations on countless names for the purpose of selling them at a higher price, as in $69 as opposed to $29, and preventing other registration services from registering the names.

Hold on just a second, please, there's more. Another of my spies registered a domain name with DollarDomianName.com and all was fine until VeriSign bought that company, started to transfer all accounts to its own servers, and changed DNS settings - without permission. What's more, VeriSign screwed up so that neither my spy nor the "tech support twit" had the new login or password needed to change the DNS settings.

To rectify the problem and resurrect his business, my spy had to fax a letterhead requesting a password change with a copy of his driver's licence and then wait five days for VeriSign to update the password so he could reset the DNS the company changed. Personally, I was under the impression that this type of practice was not considered nice at all.

Hopefully, Apache's trust in me will be stronger than that. "I think he likes me more than he does you," Amber said. "And I am beginning to think that you like him more than you do me these days."

Who do you trust these days, and who's on your not-so-trusted list? Send your trusty tips to cringe@infoworld.com.


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