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Scanlan decides against Ingram OEM role

Scanlan decides against Ingram OEM role

Less than a year after being appointed as sales director, Paul Scanlan is to leave Ingram Micro. Originally hired to manage call centre operations and sales initiatives, he said his departure was on the cards as soon as Ingram acquired Tech Pacific.

"This has obviously been happening now for five months," he said. "There is only room for one sales director and John [Walters] has a wonderful history alongside Kerry Baillie at Tech Pac.

"It stands to reason that this is a very good combination. It's also good for Ingram Micro as they can keep the continuity of what Tech Pac - which is three times the size of Ingram's local operation - has achieved."

Scanlan said he had assisted with as much of the integration as he could and the time had come to move on.

"I had a pretty good stint for the seven months [as sales director] and we eventually ended up as the number two turnaround business for Ingram Micro worldwide," he said. "They now have two very good businesses on their hands and both should do very well."

Despite the brief stint with Ingram, Scanlan said he felt he had managed to make an impact on the business.

"We reinvented our go-to-market, particularly for our in-field activity," he said. "We also realigned and restructured our sales operation to allow us to get closer to our customers and form specialised tactics. That has showed up in front-end margin growth, which has outstripped the market and increased productivity gains."

Scanlan's departure will also quash industry rumours that he was due to head up Ingram's OEM business.

"Heading the OEM business was a potential role and we toyed with it for quite a while," he said. "I took Ingram halfway through the significant support and infrastructure changes it needed to make to meet competition like Synnex. Now it is up to John and Kerry [Baillie] to finish it."

The new OEM team would be in a very good position to take share in the marketplace, Scanlan said.

"A lot of people simplistically mistake the whitebox market as being components only, but 50 per cent of whitebox sales are actually things like monitors and printers," he said. "There is a big market place there and, with Ingram addressing some 90 vendors, it will really stand on its own."

Due to leave at the end of March, Scanlan has wasted no time in looking for a new challenge and said he was even considering a life outside the channel.

"With a background in IT, office equipment and some industrial, I can keep my options open," he said. "There are lots of fun jobs outside of IT - it isn't the be all and end all."


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