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GetData launches security products into Australian retail channel

GetData launches security products into Australian retail channel

Australian software developer GetData has made a belated move into the Australian retail channel, with five of its products now selling through 10 major retail chains.

Most of the product range, which includes Recover My Files, The Computer Security Tool, Explorer View, Burn My Files and Recover My Photos, draw on GetData's expertise in forensic analysis and data recovery to recover lost or corrupted files and fix security flaws.

Despite its local pedigree, GetData established retail channels in eight overseas locations, including the US and Japan, before working on Australian retail availability. It made more sense to focus on larger overseas markets first, GetData director, Graham Henley, said.

Chains currently carrying the products include Harvey Norman, Harris Technology, Myers, Domayne, Fletchers Photographics, Chandlers, Teds Camera Stores, The Good Guys, City Software and Queensland Retravision stores. Deals with Dick Smith Electronics and OfficeWorks would be completed by Christmas, he said.

Henley, a former police forensic investigator, co-founded GetData with John Hunter and Dr Brett Hunter in 2003. He said there were no specific sales targets for the local launch.

"We have no retail experience in this country and it's difficult to get comparable data from other software categories," Henley said. However, the increased visibility of forensics and data recovery in the news, via incidents such as Enron, HIH and the New Orleans floods, had increased interest in such technologies, he said.

Lako Pacific is handling retail distribution for the products in Australia. Henley said that while the company investigated working with Ingram Micro, it chose the smaller distributor in order to get a stronger focus on its products.

GetData will also continue to sell its products online. Henley said online retailing had to be treated as an entirely separate channel, though some online buyers might now become aware of the products through their retail presence. About 5 per cent of the company's Internet sales were to Australian buyers, a figure which had remained steady.

He was unconcerned by Microsoft's moves to incorporate more security technologies into Windows Vista, which might threaten the viability of third-party security providers. "People migrating their operating systems quite frequently lose data, so it's a good opportunity for us," Henley said.


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