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SCO comes out fighting after slump

SCO comes out fighting after slump

Unix vendor, the SCO Group, plans to grow its Australian channel as it moves into the Microsoft space.

The vendor also plans new channel training and marketing initiatives as it launches a raft of new products.

The moves come as it battles a slump in licensing revenues following court battles in the US against IBM and Novell over the rights to the Unix operating system and related issues. The company claims IBM is using some Unix source code in its Linux offering so Big Blue should pay it a royalty.

SCO has also started selling licenses to commercial users of Linux — a move that has been fiercely opposed by the Open Source Industry Australia (OSIA).

SCO A/NZ director, Kieran O’Shaughnessy, said that IP licensing revenue was significantly down but claimed such revenues were always spiky.

The US-based company has just launched new versions of its UnixWare operating system, SCOoffice Server, Smallfoot embedded Unix toolkit, and Vintela Authentication which gives a single identity and passwords for both Windows and Unix servers.

O’Shaughnessy said integrating Unix technology with Microsoft Active Directory, Vintela Authentication allowed the SCO channel to provide more complete solutions to customers using both Unix and Windows.

SCO has about 150 resellers in Australia, served by two specialist distributors, Tardis Systems in Sydney and MPA Systems in Melbourne.

It is looking for channel partners from the Microsoft world, as well as traditional Unix resellers, because Vintela works on all types of Unix.

Together with distributors, O’Shaughnessy said SCO planned to work with the channel to spread the word about new products and its need for greater reseller coverage.


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