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Avaya targets VoIP for telephony continuity

Avaya targets VoIP for telephony continuity

Avaya is moving into the business continuity and disaster recovery space pushing IP telephony as the driver.

Once a core telecommunications provider only, Avaya claims the market is ripe for expansion.

One of the disaster recovery offerings Avaya is highlighting in the telephony sphere is "hot desking" VoIP to avoid interruptions to customer-facing business.

The company's South Pacific managing director Carlton Taya said telephony is a mission-critical part of a company's operations that is often overlooked in terms of business continuity.

While business continuity and disaster recovery planning involves the business, Taya said telephony is basically a function of the IT department.

"Disaster recovery specialists cannot handle telephony disaster recovery," Taya said, adding that there have been many instances in the US where business continuity plans did not include provisions for telephony. Convergence is also driving these markets.

Australian-based business continuity and disaster recovery firm Enterprise Data Corporation (EDC) recently deployed the Avaya IP Telephony network for clients of its disaster recovery service as a purpose-built standby service.

The company currently uses the system in-house for 700 staff across Sydney and Melbourne.

General manager of EDC, Frank Aue, said in the event of a disaster, call centres need to be accessed by anyone, at anytime.

"That means it has to be easy to operate while still offering complex communication services," he said.

Since rolling out IP telephony at the end of 2004, EDC estimates call costs have been reduced and general in-house productivity raised through using a converged voice and data network.


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