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No more Apples for the teacher

  • 03 May, 2005 10:07

<p>SYDNEY, Australia – Umina Public School on the New South Wales central coast is replacing its stock of Apple Macintosh (Mac) computers with Windows-based PCs. The move is a sign of the times, with students 20 to 25 times more likely to be working on PCs rather than Macs in the modern workplace.</p>
<p>“For the past five years we’ve been moving away from Macs to PCs,” said John Blair, Principal of Umina Public School. “In terms of long-term benefits for our students, the switch will ensure they are better prepared and equipped to enter and compete in today’s PC-driven workforce.”</p>
<p>Blair said that the cost of supporting and servicing the school’s Macs was another significant factor influencing the change. “In my experience replacement parts for Macs are overpriced and less reliable than what we’re getting for our PCs.”</p>
<p>Out of 29 classrooms at Umina, 15 currently use PCs. Having recently purchased 30 new PCs from Optima, the leading Australian computer manufacturer, the remaining Macs are being gradually phased out, along with the Apple laptops that Umina’s teachers have been using.</p>
<p>“Even graphics professionals that have traditionally relied on Macs are moving over to PCs,” said Juli Rush, National Education Manager, Optima Technology Solutions.</p>
<p>“PCs have matched and surpassed Macs in most areas, including graphics performance, and graphics software vendors like Adobe (maker of Photoshop software) develop their solutions for both platforms in equal measure. Ultimately software support is what makes the PC so strong, and when it comes to business applications and software, there’s just no comparison between PCs and Macs.”</p>
<p>Umina upgraded its network with the Optima WorkPro 7000 series desktop, which includes a durable glass-paneled LCD monitor and special locking device – features that have been specifically designed to deliver extra security and protection for the school environment. To ensure that teachers know how to use their PCs, Optima holds regular hands-on training sessions for schools on the central coast, advising them on new hardware and emerging technologies that may affect their teaching and benefit their students.</p>
<p>“All of our teachers are now computer – or rather PC – competent and with the extra time devoted to IT lessons this year, there will be much greater integration of technology into classroom practices that will benefit both staff and students alike,” said Blair.</p>
<p>A high-resolution image of students at Umina Public School using their new PCs is available at:
http://www.watterson.com.au/Downloads/Optima/Business_Releases/Umina_Public_School.jpg</p>
<p>About Optima Technology Solutions</p>
<p>Founded in 1989 Optima has grown to become Australia's leading manufacturer of notebook and desktop personal computers, and servers. Headquartered in Sydney, with branch offices in Melbourne and Brisbane, Optima is ideally placed by size and strength to promptly supply and actively support customers through a nationwide supply and service network.</p>

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