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SCO brings its licenses and lawsuits down under

SCO brings its licenses and lawsuits down under

The SCO Group has announced that the SCO Intellectual Property License is now available for sale in Australia and New Zealand.

The controversial “license” permits the use of what SCO claims is its own intellectual property, hidden within the code of popular Linux distributions.

“By purchasing the license, customers are properly compensating SCO for the Unix source code, derivative Unix code and other Unix-related intellectual property and copyrights owned by SCO as it is currently found in Linux,” the company said.

The SCO IP license will be priced at $999 per server processor and $285 per desktop processor. The vendor also plans to market the license to those embedded device manufacturers that use Linux in their devices.

Currently, SCO is uncertain which of its distributors and resellers will be selling the licenses.

Regional general manager, Kieran O’Shaughnessy, said he was discussing the options with local Australian distributors, Tardis and MPA Systems, this week, and should make a decision on who will distribute the licenses by the end of next week.

“We are making them available to the market through a limited number of resellers," he said. "There is a significant amount of training and information that needs to be passed on to these resellers. We are trying to control the flow of information."

O'Shaughnessy said there was no set formula in place as to how long a Linux user would be given between being warned about infringing on SCO's copyright and having legal action taken against them.

"We will pursue each case on its merits," he said. "Certainly, resorting to legal action would be a last resort that we would prefer to avoid."


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