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Notes from the field: Getting an education

Notes from the field: Getting an education

Maybe it's the time of year or maybe it's my continuing arguments with Rose, but I've been feeling restless and have actually been considering something radical: a return to college to study one of my interests - psychology. And unlike my Evil Twin - whose false claims to be a former Stanford professor were exposed last week - if I do pursue this plan, I will actually get the degree before I start boasting about it.

There was a lot of boasting and showing off at the opening of the Microsoft Center in Silicon Valley. Among the more bizarre stunts, Linux enthusiasts planned to dump 342 Linux CDs with tea bags taped to them in San Francisco Bay. The tea was to commemorate the 1773 Boston Tea Party.

Speaking of Linux, I hear Oracle is working on bringing support for its parallel database technology to Linux sometime in 1999, and that a development environment project is afoot at Corel to make it easy to migrate existing Windows applications to run on Linux. The technology would obviate the need for an all-out port, and Corel might even make the source code open so all kinds of Windows applications could move to Linux.

Bigger threat

It's hard to say whether it's Linux or the US Justice Department that is the bigger threat to Microsoft, but despite the continuing case against it, it's still business as usual in Redmond. And emphasising that they're still friends, Intel chief Andy Grove paid a visit to the Microsoft campus last week, which is odd considering that Intel vice president Steven McGeady was in Washington at the same time testifying against Microsoft.

Finally, Amazon.com and Barnes & Noble got into a bizarre dialogue last week, in which each claimed to be less successful than the other. After Barnes & Noble bought Ingram Book Group, Amazon.com issued a press release commenting on the acquisition, and referring to Barnes & Noble as a "goliath." Barnes & Noble countered by saying that Amazon.com is bigger than it, Borders, and all other independent booksellers combined, and then Amazon.com issued a final press release which simply stated, "Oh".


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