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Netbridge relocates Sanyo in half a day

Netbridge relocates Sanyo in half a day

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Integrator Netbridge Systems has demonstrated that a full enterprise relocation and platform migration doesn't have to be a logistical nightmare and business risk by performing such a task for Sanyo Australia.

With mission-critical systems and applications involved, the project, which relocated the consumer goods importer from Homebush to Arndell Park and migrated from legacy systems for Y2K-compliance, had to be completed with minimal disruption to business and virtually no downtime.

Peter Durie, professional services manager for Netbridge, said the relocation project commenced on a recent Friday afternoon and was scheduled to be completed by the opening of business the following Monday. Aside from a few tests completed the following day, Sanyo's IT systems, including its new voice and data network, were back in business by the Friday evening.

"Relocation is a huge exercise for any company," Durie said.

"The fact that most companies now view their IT infrastructures as being mission-critical means that minimising downtime is the key requirement. "It may have only been 25 minutes up the M2 freeway, but it was a real logistics exercise and definitely not as simple as people think. Fortunately, Netbridge has built considerable expertise in this area and the project manager [David Salvin] did a fantastic job."

As well as a customer service call centre, Sanyo had an AS400 system, nearly 80 PCs, the complete network infrastructure and all its interstate communications to be moved. One old mainframe was unable to be moved so the communications between it and the new premises also had to be set up.

The migration program, for which Netbridge supplied all the hardware and software, was in preparation for three months and was accompanied by a comprehensive contingency plan.

"Critical to the migration process was the ceaseless operation of the mainframe," said Glenn Williams, Sanyo's ISD manager. "I wanted to avoid relocating the mainframe as this would require setting up a special computer environment for only a short period.

"Instead Netbridge built a temporary network connecting the mainframe to the central server at Arndell while sustaining the performance of the national client/server network."

Durie said half the call centre was taken offline and then reassembled at the new premises before the other half received the same treatment.


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