Software: Opinions

Opinions
  • The first 29 days of Windows 10

    For a version of Windows on which Microsoft placed so much emphasis on upgrades, Windows 10 has a remarkable set of post-upgrade problems.

  • Oracle, still clueless about security

    Oracle Chief Security Officer Mary Ann Davidson let loose a long rant about people who dare to look into the security of the company’s products. Oracle quickly backed away from those remarks, but has it faced up to the fact that its CSO has some wrongheaded notions about her own area of expertise?

  • Twitter on the Mac: Do your job, or get out of the way

    Three years ago this month Twitter broke its covenant with the third-party developers who helped fuel its initial growth and create some of its most innovative features. The message was clear: Twitter was in charge of its own platform, and while other Twitter apps would be tolerated, it would only be in limited fashion and for a limited time.

  • Why I won't write a requiem for Google+

    Over the last couple years, this TechWatch blog has been home to requiems for a number of products and services that have either died or pretty much died, collapsing to the point where they no longer resemble their once-great former selves.

  • For Linux, Supercomputers R Us

    Supercomputers are serious things, called on to do serious computing. They tend to be engaged in serious pursuits like atomic bomb simulations, climate modeling and high-level physics. Naturally, they cost serious money. At the very top of the latest <a href="http://www.top500.org/">Top500</a> supercomputer ranking is the Tianhe-2 supercomputer at China's National University of Defense Technology. It cost about $390 million to build.

  • Time for a ‘Flash' extinction level event

    Ages ago the dinosaurs roamed the earth. All evidence demonstrates that they met with an untimely end. Much in the same vein, I firmly believe that Adobe's Flash has reached it's own extinction level event. Time for this dinosaur to quietly slip into the tar pits and be relegated to the mists of time.

  • Why Google's enterprise pitch is a confusing mess

    Can you explain to your business colleagues what Google for Work is? If so, you're miles ahead of Google. The company's foray into the enterprise has been little more than a hodgepodge of silos, delineated by products and their respective teams. The company is doing a poor job marketing the entirety of Google for Work because the initiative overlaps with individual product sales and leads to operational confusion.

  • Managing Apple Macs and Windows Systems with the Same SCCM Tool

    Organizations are looking to manage their Apple Macs along side their existing Windows systems using existing tools already used in enterprises like Microsoft's System Center Configuration Manager (SCCM). Parallels (the maker of virtual machine technology that has allowed Mac users to run Windows guest sessions for years) just updated their add-in to SCCM, "Parallels Mac Management 4.0" for Microsoft SCCM.

  • New A.I. tech helps you write right

    This column is a little cheerful, slightly analytical, both confident and tentative and just a tiny bit angry. But mostly, it's open, agreeable and conscientious. At least that's what IBM's Watson thinks.

  • The Apple Watch disrupts, but is that enough?

    Disruptive technology doesn't come along often, and is often initially dismissed because it's easy to ignore something you've lived an entire life without. But every once in a while a bit of tech comes along that makes it easier to do what you're already doing.

  • The OPM lawsuit will only make the lawyers rich

    Sensitive data pertaining to millions of people was compromised in the data breach at the U.S. Office of Personnel Management. I suspect that millions of those people smiled when they heard about the <a href="http://www.computerworld.com/article/2942038/security/opm-hit-by-classaction-suit-over-breach-of-federal-employee-data.html">filing of a class-action lawsuit filed against the OPM</a>. They would like some recompense for the incredible hassle that data breach caused them. And they probably want to see the OPM pay for its mistakes. Unfortunately, those smiles are probably about all they will get out of the lawsuit.

  • Consumers love Samsung, but don't trust Apple or Facebook

    Judging by its huge sales numbers and unrivaled consumer interest in its products, you'd think that no company in the tech arena was more beloved than Apple. Think again. It turns out Samsung is the "most reputable" tech company in the world, at least according to a recent survey of more than 5,000 consumers.

  • Turning off Connect makes Apple Music better

    Connect is the part of Apple Music where you'll supposedly enjoy a close, personal relationship with the artists and bands you care about. But just artists, not your friends - unlike Spotify and Rdio, you can't build a list of your friends, see what they're listening to and enjoying, subscribe to each other's handmade playlists, or collaborate on a shared playlist, say, for an upcoming road trip or party.

  • Finding your way around Apple's iOS 9

    Ever since the move away from skeuomorphics in version 7, iOS has been in a state of flux -- one that many iPhone and iPad users and reviewers noted came at the expense of stability. With iOS 9 due out in public beta next month and to the general public this Spring, Apple continues refining the appearance and behavior of the software that powers the iPhone, iPod touch and iPad. And just as it's doing with OS X 10.11 El Capitan, Apple is adding a variety of under-the-hood improvements and new tricks that focus on proactivity, UI refinements, and best of all, stability and performance.