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Software: Opinions

Opinions
  • Consumers love Samsung, but don't trust Apple or Facebook

    Judging by its huge sales numbers and unrivaled consumer interest in its products, you'd think that no company in the tech arena was more beloved than Apple. Think again. It turns out Samsung is the "most reputable" tech company in the world, at least according to a recent survey of more than 5,000 consumers.

  • Turning off Connect makes Apple Music better

    Connect is the part of Apple Music where you'll supposedly enjoy a close, personal relationship with the artists and bands you care about. But just artists, not your friends - unlike Spotify and Rdio, you can't build a list of your friends, see what they're listening to and enjoying, subscribe to each other's handmade playlists, or collaborate on a shared playlist, say, for an upcoming road trip or party.

  • Finding your way around Apple's iOS 9

    Ever since the move away from skeuomorphics in version 7, iOS has been in a state of flux -- one that many iPhone and iPad users and reviewers noted came at the expense of stability. With iOS 9 due out in public beta next month and to the general public this Spring, Apple continues refining the appearance and behavior of the software that powers the iPhone, iPod touch and iPad. And just as it's doing with OS X 10.11 El Capitan, Apple is adding a variety of under-the-hood improvements and new tricks that focus on proactivity, UI refinements, and best of all, stability and performance.

  • Tim Cook's Apple is the Apple we need

    Since Tim Cook took the reins in Cupertino, almost four years ago, a gradual but inexorable change has taken place. And, speaking as a longtime follower of the company, there was to me no greater indication of that than this past week's kerfuffle over artist royalty payments, and the eventual policy reversal from the company. Let us count the ways in which this whole to-do reflects the changing face of the company.

  • yARN: How the Apple Watch is preparing us for an iPhone without a home button

    It's come a long way since its humble beginnings, but the iPhone has yet to go through a truly radical transformation. While the iPhone 6 was certainly a significant upgrade from the 5s, each biannual revision has mostly brought expected design changes--larger screens, higher resolutions, thinner chassis--and for the most part, the iPhone hasn't strayed too far from its original concept.

  • El Capitan's 5 biggest improvements

    When Apple execs <a href="http://www.computerworld.com/article/2932716/apple-ios/apple-unwraps-streaming-service-adds-intelligence-to-ios-and-os-x.html">took the stage last week</a> for the company's annual World Wide Developers Conference (WWDC), they covered a lot of ground -- discussing changes to iOS 9, updates to watchOS, details about the company's music-streaming plans and specifics about OS X 10.11, <a href="http://www.apple.com/osx/elcapitan-preview/">better known as El Capitan</a>. All three platforms will see improvements focused on performance, privacy and refinements when they arrive later this year.

  • Google on Apple: The end is near

    The chat room and social network religious wars between Apple and Google demand that you take sides. But I've always felt that the best experience includes a cherry-picking of Apple hardware, Google services and apps from both.

  • The Internet of Growing Things

    Earlier this month, in Monterey, Calif., a meeting organized by the Produce Marketing Association provided an opportunity for a group of local growers of crops such as lettuce, artichokes and strawberries to find out how the latest digital technologies were changing agriculture. Participants heard about how technologies like robots, drones and predictive analytics could help them improve their operations.

  • EU regulators misunderstand big data

    Some <a href="http://www.wsj.com/articles/big-data-looms-as-next-battle-in-europe-1429217668">European Union regulators reportedly</a> are concerned that major Internet companies such as Google and Facebook gain an unfair competitive advantage from the detailed consumer data they hold, since other companies can never hope to amass anywhere near as much of it. In addition, some regulators worry that with less competition, these data-rich companies will disregard their customers' privacy preferences and become more invasive. Not only are these regulators wrong, but by mistakenly classifying big data as anti-competitive and anti-consumer, they risk driving European companies away from the most productive uses of data, which would harm the competitiveness of European businesses and limit the potential consumer benefits.

  • Open Source Meets Telecom at NFV World Congress

    When Linux first became a serious challenger for enterprise-class infrastructure, traditional IT vendors had to contend and to rationalize just what exactly this open source thing was. The initial response from many vendors was to attempt to stop it, but it only grew.

  • Facebook: The other Internet

    You can do almost everything online. Most people spend most of their web time doing just three things: communicating, buying things and consuming content.

  • IT leadership lessons from Sun Tzu: Passion matters

    I recently attended an event celebrating the 50th Anniversary of Moore's law and was entranced by some of the old stories from Intel's founding. Part of what I found fascinating was the virtual passing of the torch from the passionate founder Gordon Moore to Intel's current CEO Brian Krzanich.

  • Europe's war against U.S. tech is wrongheaded

    What do Facebook, Apple, Google, Amazon and Netflix have in common? In addition to being U.S. tech giants, they're in the crosshairs of European regulators and may face big fines and stiff rules reining in the way they operate on the continent.

  • What does HP think it's doing?

    Winston Churchill once said of Russia, "It is a riddle, wrapped in a mystery, inside an enigma." Now, I don't deal with international politics. I just write about technology. But when I've looked at HP lately I've been left thinking of its strategy as, well, "a riddle, wrapped in a mystery, inside an enigma."