Software: Features

Features
  • Salesforce at 15: Industry disruptor wards off midlife crisis

    By Chris Kanaracus | 23 April, 2014 04:37

    Salesforce.com recently celebrated its 15th year in existence, and as the SaaS (software-as-a-service) vendor races toward US$5 billion in revenue its influence on the industry is being felt more than ever. At the same time, some signs indicate that Salesforce.com is having a few growing pains, as well as showing some trappings of the mega-vendors it once mocked with its "End of Software" marketing campaign.

  • Windows' new normal shows software-as-a-service ambitions

    By Gregg Keizer | 18 April, 2014 06:27

    Microsoft's new updating "normal" for Windows -- a faster-paced tempo that demands customers apply releases within weeks -- is a first step in moving the OS to a services-style model. But companies may be leery of the change.

  • Don't wait for Windows 9: How to get a Start Menu, windowed Metro apps today

    By Brad Chacos | 17 April, 2014 02:46

    Between the release of the PC-friendly spring update for Windows 8.1 and the newfound introduction of universal "buy once, play anywhere" Windows apps, Microsoft is doing all it can to spur the One Microsoft vision while, well, letting a PC be a PC and a tablet be a tablet. But, sadly, the most anticipated improvements have yet to arrive.

  • Microsoft's Office for iPad shakes up mobile enterprise

    By Tom Kaneshige | 15 April, 2014 05:43

    It's hard to overstate the impact of the Microsoft Office for iPad. The arrival of the dominant productivity suite on the dominant tablet promises to change how iPads are viewed in the enterprise. Office for iPad may also crush competitive apps, shut out Cloud storage providers and limit MDM vendors.

  • The battle of the digital assistants: Cortana vs Now vs Siri

    By Mark Hachman | 14 April, 2014 23:08

    The personal computer has endured for more than 30 years. We understand it. It's familiar. But digital assistants--the new breed of smartphone data butlers designed to make our lives simpler--have yet to climb out of their cribs.

  • AI gets its groove back

    By Lamont Wood | 14 April, 2014 20:35

    Thanks to the advent of Big Data, new algorithms and massive, affordable computing power, artificial intelligence is now, finally, on a roll again.

  • How to support Windows XP now that Microsoft isn't

    By Paul Rubens | 07 April, 2014 23:54

    Official Microsoft support for Windows XP has ended. However, as many as 20 per cent of business endpoints still use the popular operating system. If your company ranks among those still using XP, here's how you can protect your machines from the forthcoming onslaught of security vulnerabilities.

  • The Windows XP upgrade question: Windows 7 or Windows 8?

    By Jared Newman | 05 April, 2014 00:01

    Microsoft is ending support for Windows XP on April 8. While you're technically free to keep using the 12-year old operating system, doing so may put you at greater security risk for attack as future vulnerabilities go unpatched.

  • At Build, mobility gets a boost with universal Windows apps

    By Matt Hamblen | 04 April, 2014 21:21

    Microsoft's announcement of universal Windows apps demonstrates the company's commitment to improving its share of the tablet and smartphone markets.

  • Can Microsoft's Windows Phone OS surge in market share?

    By Matt Hamblen | 02 April, 2014 06:34

    Microsoft is expected to launch an update to its Windows Phone platform to version 8.1 at its annual Build developer conference on Wednesday, followed by a separate Nokia event later in the day, reportedly to announce two phones running the new OS.

  • Intel plays defense against ARM with Cloudera stake

    By Agam Shah | 01 April, 2014 07:40

    Intel's US$740 million investment in software company Cloudera will help sell more x86 chips in Hadoop installations, but it could also be a defensive move to maintain its server lead from the emerging threat posed by 64-bit ARM servers.

  • Office for iPad vs. iWork: The battle for tablet productivity

    By Tony Bradley | 01 April, 2014 00:11

    Once Office for iPad was announced, I couldn't wait to stage a bare-knuckled battle with iWork, the productivity suite that's held down the fort on iPad for four years. I pitted Apple's Pages, Numbers, and Keynote against Microsoft's Word, Excel, and PowerPoint apps, respectively, to determine which better provided all the tools one would need in at typical work environment.

  • Wall to wall Apple: How iOS could make its way into your home

    By Marco Tabini | 27 March, 2014 16:02

    Our residences are long overdue for a technological makeover. More and more electronics have, over the years, found their way into houses and apartments: Everything from thermostats to ovens and washing machines are, for all intents and purposes, run by small computers. To boot, many dwellings are now completely covered by wireless networks that can carry very significant amounts of data, without requiring expensive wiring.

  • Microsoft returns to scare tactic well in dump-XP campaign

    By Gregg Keizer | 26 March, 2014 16:06

    Microsoft has pulled out the big guns - a fear-of-God approach - to scare users into dumping Windows XP, telling them the most popular tasks done on a PC will put them in the crosshairs of cyber criminals.

  • In-memory technologies move databases to real time

    By Joab Jackson | 24 March, 2014 17:12

    Last week, application-performance monitoring service provider New Relic launched an offering that allows customers to mine its operational data for business intelligence.

  • Tech watch: Everything and anything

    By Patrick Budmar | 24 March, 2014 15:40

    Data has always been created in growing amounts, but not in the ways it is today. The Internet of Everything is the end result, but where does it leave the IT industry?

  • Government open data proves a treasure trove for savvy businesses

    By Cindy Waxer | 24 March, 2014 10:37

    Ever since President Obama signed the Open Data Executive Order, government agencies have been making their vast data stores available to the public. These once-secret data sets are proving a valuable business resource, too.

  • Career Watch: The rise of people architecture

    By Jamie Eckle | 24 March, 2014 10:37

    In managing human resources, people architecture is gaining popularity, says IT workforce analyst David Foote. He explains what it is and why it's on the rise.

  • Microsoft scrambles to simplify its licensing

    By Juan Carlos Perez | 19 March, 2014 13:30

    Microsoft is pledging dramatic improvements to its notoriously complex enterprise licensing, but experts are skeptical about the potential impact of the plan.

  • Suddenly, wearables are big with new developer software releases

    By Matt Hamblen | 18 March, 2014 20:23

    If you didn't already think wearables were going to be big, think again. Google and Samsung are among the biggest players in this emerging tech field and both just made new wearable app developer announcements.

Get exclusive access to ARN's news, research and invitation only events.
ARN Distributor Directory
ARN Vendor Directory
Microsites

iAsset is a channel management ecosystem that automates all major aspects of the entire sales,marketing and service process, including data tracking, integrated learning, knowledge management and product lifecycle management.

 

Latest News

02:01PM
Aldi to sell Medion Android tab for sub-$200
04:32PM
Pacnet collaborates with China Telecom
04:21PM
4K brings flexibility to digital photography: Panasonic
03:22PM
MAXON partners with Side Effects Software
More News
24 Apr
The China Healthcare ICT Conference 2014
05 May
CeBIT Australia 2014
06 May
Oracle Day 2014 - Across 2 Cities
06 May
Oracle Day 2014 - Across 2 Cities
View all events