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News
  • Petition targets Apple over ‘spyware' in OS X Yosemite

    By Jon Gold | 31 October, 2014 06:48

    Apple should remove "spyware" from its new Yosemite release of OS X, according to an online petition that has received 14,450 signatures as of early Thursday afternoon.

  • One code to rule them all: Dronecode

    By By Paul Fraidenburgh | 31 October, 2014 06:09

    Drones have just found their new best friends: coders. On Oct. 13, the Linux Foundation unveiled a nonprofit organization called the Dronecode Project, an open-source development initiative uniting thousands of coders for the purpose of building an aerial operating system for drones. Hopeful that the project will bring order to the chaos that has surrounded software developers as they sprint to carve out a share of the bourgeoning market for unmanned aircraft systems (UAS), UAS operators are now asking whether Dronecode will finally provide the horsepower and industry-wide support needed to launch a universal drone operating system.

  • After rocket explosion, no air, water pollutants detected

    By Sharon Gaudin | 31 October, 2014 01:29

    The initial assessment of the explosion that destroyed an Antares rocket and cargo craft on launch on Tuesday evening showed no signs that the blast emitted pollution into the water or air around the launch area in Virginia.

  • Pirate Bay co-founder found guilty of hacking in Denmark

    By Loek Essers | 31 October, 2014 00:05

    Pirate Bay co-founder Gottfrid Svartholm Warg was found guilty of hacking and serious vandalism in the Court of Fredriksberg in Denmark on Thursday.

  • Telstra and Motorola Solutions team for public safety

    By Nermin Bajric | 30 October, 2014 12:02

    The capabilities of Telstra’s LTE Advanced Network for Emergency Services (LANES) will be extended through the addition of Motorola Solutions’ dynamic prioritisation, smart public safety applications, interoperability solutions, and public safety-optimised devices.

Features
Interviews
  • OpenDaylight Executive Director spells out where this open source SDN efforts stands

    By John Dix | 16 September, 2014 03:57

    The Open Networking Foundation (ONF) is the public face of the Software Defined Networking movement, spelling out requirements and defining standards. The group's board includes Google, Facebook, Yahoo, Microsoft and Goldman Sachs on the data center side, and Verizon, Deutsche Telekom and NTT Communications on the service provider side. Additionally, there are close to 150 members, from global telcos to startups. To get a sense of where the movement stands, Network World Editor in Chief John Dix tracked down ONF Executive Director Dan Pitt, who spent 20 years developing network architecture, technology, standards, and products at IBM Networking Systems, Hewlett Packard and Bay Networks.

  • Q&A: 3D gun maker Cody Wilson defends freedom to print guns

    By Lucas Mearian | 03 June, 2014 07:42

    Cody Wilson, founder of Defense Distributed, contests claims his 3D printed gun isn't safe and will try to continue to make 3D gun plans available.

  • Intel/McAfee: What's the future of security?

    By Ellen Messmer | 05 July, 2012 16:27

    Intel completed its multibillion-dollar acquisition of McAfee almost a year and a half ago, and this week McAfee co-President Mike DeCesare spoke with Network World senior editor Ellen Messmer about what the merger of Intel's chip-making capabilities and McAfee's security expertise is expected to bring down the road.

  • Red Hat CEO Jim Whitehurst weighs in on strategy, Oracle and growth

    By Chris Kanaracus | 28 June, 2012 14:51

    Red Hat CEO Jim Whitehurst is coming up on his five-year anniversary at the helm, following his arrival in December 2007. Under Whitehurst's leadership, Red Hat's revenue has grown from US$523 million in its fiscal 2008 to more than $1.1 billion in its fiscal 2012, without deviating from its core strategy of open-source infrastructure software.

  • Where today's datacenters have gone wrong

    By Tom Sullivan | 10 March, 2009 09:25

    Today's datacenters are downright cramped, yet forced to continue absorbing more technologies and tapping into the latest trends, all while maximizing efficiency and reducing costs. The current recession makes now the time to glance back for a historical perspective to better understand how to not only survive in this different world but also to best prepare for the future.

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