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Stories by Preston Gralla

  • Broadband for all

    There's no mere digital divide in the United States; it's a chasm. It ensures that the have-nots will always have less, and those with broadband access will have more. It's time to finally end that, and guarantee that everyone in the country, no matter how poor, gets broadband and its many benefits.

  • Word 2013 cheat sheet

    The buzz today may be all about Office 2016 for Windows, which is due to be released this fall, but many business users are still getting acquainted with Office 2013 and will continue to use it for some time. Use this Word 2013 cheat sheet to help take advantage of all it has to offer.

  • Review: Windows 10 Insider Preview -- a nearly finished OS

    Microsoft has been racing to put the final touches on Windows 10 before its expected release date in late July. There have been three public updates in the last month: Builds 10061, 10074 and 10122. At this point, the interface and features for the new operating system are essentially set -- on May 20, Gabe Aul, engineering general manager at Microsoft, <a href="https://blogs.windows.com/bloggingwindows/2015/05/20/announcing-windows-10-insider-preview-build-10122-for-pcs/">wrote about build 10122</a> on the company's official blog: "From here on out you'll see fewer big feature changes from build to build, and more tuning, tweaking, stabilizing, and polishing."

  • Europe's war against U.S. tech is wrongheaded

    What do Facebook, Apple, Google, Amazon and Netflix have in common? In addition to being U.S. tech giants, they're in the crosshairs of European regulators and may face big fines and stiff rules reining in the way they operate on the continent.

  • We've got net neutrality. Now the real work begins.

    Now that <a href="http://www.computerworld.com/article/2889261/fcc-approves-net-neutrality-rules-reclassifies-broadband-as-utility.html">net neutrality is the law of the land</a>, you may feel inclined to pat yourself on the back for a job well done. After all, a big reason the FCC backed net neutrality was the outpouring of support for it.

  • First look: Microsoft's Office 2016 IT Pro and Developer Preview

    The first glance at the future of Office for Windows is here, in the form of the <a href="http://blogs.office.com/2015/03/16/announcing-the-office-2016-it-pro-and-developer-preview/">Office 2016 IT Pro and Developer Preview</a>. It's the initial public iteration of the suite that will be released sometime in the second half of 2015, so at this point it's very much a work in progress.

  • Two OSes in one: DuOS-M puts Android on your Windows device

    Do you have a favorite Android app that you wish you could run on your Windows tablet or laptop? Well, now you can. A new program called <a href="http://www.amiduos.com/">DuOS-M</a> runs full-blown Android as its own Windows application, so that you run almost any Android app on a Windows 7/8/8.1 system.

  • New rules: How to unlock your smartphone

    Until recently, if you wanted to unlock your phone in order to switch carriers, there was a good chance that you'd have to do it without the cooperation of the carrier you were with. You could search online for the codes that might unlock your device -- or try to hack it in other ways. But what you usually couldn't do was call your carrier and ask how to do it.

  • Windows 10 deep-dive review: Finally, a unified operating system

    The second preview release of <a href="http://www.computerworld.com/article/2874955/microsoft-releases-big-update-to-windows-10-preview.html">Windows 10</a> begins to flesh out Microsoft's vision of an operating system that bridges the gap between traditional PCs and touch-based tablets -- something it failed at dismally in Windows 8. More than that, the new release reveals a single operating system that shape-shifts according to the device it's running on, be that a PC, a tablet or a phone.

  • HoloLens: Look who's innovating

    Poor, slow-footed old Microsoft. It just can't adapt to changing times or keep up with more innovative, agile and forward-looking companies like Apple and Google. That's been the way many of us have thought of Microsoft for a long time. But it may be our thinking that's old and outdated.

  • 2015 is make or break for Microsoft

    This year we are finally going to get an answer to one of the big questions in the technology world. For years, people have been debating whether Microsoft will retain its position as one of the world's dominant tech companies or steadily become less relevant.

  • What Gamergate says about the tech industry

    For the last two months the video-game industry has been embroiled in an ugly outbreak of name-calling and worse. This dustup, called <a href="http://www.computerworld.com/article/2840556/the-charge-of-the-troll-brigade-what-to-know-about-gamergate.html">Gamergate</a>, was named after a hashtag on Twitter, where much of the nasty fight has taken place. It's a battle in which women have been threatened with violence and even death by hardcore gamers. The women's crime, in their eyes: They criticized what they see as the anti-woman, anti-gay, racist nature of games and many people in the industry.