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iPad users get access to MobileSputnik

iPad users get access to MobileSputnik

Good Technology teams with MobilityLab for release

Good Technology and MobilityLab LLC have released MobileSputnik for Good.

The new version of the productivity application will allow iOS tablets to access features previously only available to their Android counterparts.

The app uses the Good Dynamics secure mobility platform and Good’s shared services framework. The firm said this delivers enterprise-grade security and access to corporate information assets, on-premise deployment and smooth integration into an existing enterprise IT and information security landscape.

Good Technology vice-president of alliances, Herve Danzelaud, said the company was excited to welcome MobilityLab and the MobileSputnik for Good solution into the Good Dynamics ecosystem.

“With the increasing pace of mobility, our customers are looking for richly featured, enterprise-grade collaboration solutions that meet their demanding security requirements.”

MobilityLab managing director, Sergey Orlik, commented that the new app provides business users with a secure mobile environment so they can be more productive.

“By integrating MobileSputnik with the Good Dynamics platform and its shared services framework we can fully integrate with Good for enterprise’s secure email, calendar, contacts, and browser access while providing iPad users with secured access to corporate documents stored in enterprise file resources, send files and complete complex tasks and workflows, all within Good’s industry-leading secure container.”

MobileSputnik for Good is available for iPad users through the Good Dynamics marketplace.

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Tags Productivity AppsMobileSputnikiosGood TechnologymobilitylabiPad

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