Menu
Red Hat deploys ServiceNow in modernisation bid

Red Hat deploys ServiceNow in modernisation bid

Red Hat has consolidated its various tools for running IT workflows into a single system of record.

Open source solutions provider Red Hat has enlisted Cloud provider ServiceNow to deploy Software-as-a-Service in a modernisation drive.

With ServiceNow, Red Hat has consolidated its various tools for running IT workflows into a single system of record.

Red Hat’s legacy IT workflow tools had limited the overall effectiveness of IT to adapt, according to a company statement.

Running servers, storage and networking in-house had made it difficult to allocate resources when multiple change requests occurred simultaneously, and the tools were unable to provide visibility into resource utilisation.

As a result, IT staff lacked the means to avoid problems and resolve them quickly as they occurred.

Red Hat has since rolled out the ServiceNow IT Service Automation Suite and consolidated the management of incidents, problems and changes into a global cloud-based single system of record for IT.

IT now has better visibility into resource utilisation, and can allocate resources to support new projects that drive revenue.

Previously, implementing change could involve a six week programming effort that might cost tens of thousands of dollars.

Red Hat chief information officer, Lee Congdon, said the company's legacy product showed how difficult it was to run IT management servers internally.

"But now, we’re able to deliver services more effectively, more efficiently and more flexibly than if we were trying to set up IT service automation on premise.”

Follow Us

Join the ARN newsletter!

Error: Please check your email address.

Tags Lee CongdonServcieNowRed HatServiceNow IT Service Automation SuiteRed Hat chief information officer

Upcoming

Slideshows

In Pictures: Houston, we have a bug - 9 famous software glitches in space

In Pictures: Houston, we have a bug - 9 famous software glitches in space

There’s never a good time to run into software bugs, but some times are worse than others - like during a mission to space. Spacecraft of all shapes and sizes rely heavily on software to complete their objectives. But those missions can be quickly ended by the simplest of human errors when writing code. The omission of an overbar here or overflow error checking code there can mean the difference between success or failure, not to mention the loss of hundreds of millions of dollars, years of work and, on manned missions, human life. Use the arrows above to read about 9 examples that show that, despite the care with which these systems are built, bugs have occurred in spacecraft software since we started to fling rockets into space - and will, no doubt, continue to crop up.

In Pictures: Houston, we have a bug - 9 famous software glitches in space
IN PICTURES: Windows 10 Sydney launch

IN PICTURES: Windows 10 Sydney launch

Tech lovers and party-goers alike headed down to Mrs Macquarie's Chair to be part of the world-first Windows 10 Launch Party. The night featured a presentation by Microsoft Australia managing director, Pip Marlow, DJs, live demonstrations and digital artistry by Lister.

IN PICTURES: Windows 10 Sydney launch

iasset.com is a channel management ecosystem that automates all major aspects of the entire sales, marketing and service process, including data tracking, integrated learning, knowledge management and product lifecycle management.

Show Comments