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NICTA and Monash unveil new computing lab

NICTA and Monash unveil new computing lab

Optimisation tools to help transport, logistics, health, utilities and mining sectors

Scientists from Australian ICT research centre, NICTA, and Monash University have opened a new lab that aims to make the benefits of advanced computing accessible to the Australian industry.

A 15-to-20 strong team of computer scientists and engineers will work in a new NICTA Laboratory at Monash University’s Caulfield Campus which will involve both the School of IT and Engineering, according to a statement from NICTA.

The lab will host an ‘Optimisation research team’ whose goal is to enable advanced computer modelling tools to be used by non-experts, to solve important problems in disaster management, future energy systems, logistics, and supply chains, the statement said.

Optimisation tools are used to support a wide range of business processes that are a part of everyday Australian daily life: human resources (for instance, scheduling aircraft and crews); distribution (for instance, coordinating steel production, organising transport of minerals from mines to ports); purchasing, and health (such as treating cancer and designing new drugs).

NICTA project leader and professor, Peter Stuckey, said, “Building or using a new tool to optimise a system currently requires a Ph.D. level aptitude. We want to help Australian businesses by making this technology much easier to use so that more people can take advantage of it.”

NICTA CEO, Hugh Durrant-Whyte, added the move will yield some fantastic results for Victoria and all of Australia.

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