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AirWatch appoints Baum as APAC managing director

AirWatch appoints Baum as APAC managing director

Expands Asia-Pacific presence

Mobile security and enterprise mobility management vendor, AirWatch, has hired Jeff Baum as its Asia-Pacific managing director.

The newly-created role will see Baum manage the growing team, direct strategy, cultivate customer and partner relationships, and scale operations in the region.

Rob Roe will still manage the A/NZ office.

AirWatch president and CEO, John Marshall, said the appointment was made as the company plans to expand its presence within the Asia-Pacific region.

On a global scale, it most recently secured a $US200 million Series A funding round from Insight Ventures Partners out of New York City and hired more than 1000 people in the past year.

Within the Asia-Pacific region, it doubled the number of employees to support customer demand and added more than 15 strategic partners to drive growth in the past year.

Marshall said the company’s growth is led by large multi-national organisations adopting mobility initiatives and supporting BYOD programs.

“Asia-Pacific continues to experience a rapid rate of mobile device adoption in the enterprise, and organisations are looking for industry leaders to support their mobile initiatives as the ecosystem evolves,” he said.

He also claimed that Baum brings more than 20 years’ of mobility and leadership experience in international markets.

Baum most recently served at Manhattan Associates as its Asia-Pacific internal operations senior vice-president, a position he held for 15 years since 1998.

He has also previously held a variety of engineering, business development and management positions at Motorola, HP, Logisticon and Haushahn Systems & Engineers.

Baum will be based in the company’s Singapore office.

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