EDGE 2015 is starting in

Find out more EDGE 2015
Menu
One in two Australians do not lock mobile devices: Aruba

One in two Australians do not lock mobile devices: Aruba

Networking vendor discovers that an overwhelming number of users do not use passwords to lock their smartphones

A recent study by Aruba Networks has found that one in two Australians do not have a lock engaged on their mobile device.

A/NZ managing director, Steve Coad, admits that this result is surprising, as the device lock is the first level of security that is simple to setup.

“That means 50 per cent of all Australians are exposed if they lose their device,” he said.

Another key finding in the survey was only 32 per cent of respondents showing a willingness to tell their boss or IT department away that they have lost their device straight.

“This becomes more worrisome when you remember that 50 per cent of respondents said those very same devices are unlocked,” Coad said.

Quarter of respondents also said they were worried about sending a message to professional contact by mistake that was actually intended for a personal contact.

Coad expected this result to be higher, as “most people have probably done this at some point.”

About 36 per cent of respondents said loosing their devices with sensitive information, such as personal or work data, was a pressing concern.

While Coad admits that people losing devices is not a common occurrence, the fact that one third of respondents show concern was in line with his expectations.

“These people are the ones that likely do have a password lock on their device,” he said.

Do it yourself

About 45 per cent of the workers said they had to provide their own mobile device if they wish to use one in a professional capacity, as the company is not provisioning it.

Coad said this result is a validation of BYOD gaining traction in the workplace.

“A lot of companies are trying to save costs, where they may have traditionally issued Blackberries to staff,” he said.

“When those same staff turn around and want a different smartphone or tablet, then some of the corporations are saying they should buy it themselves.”

Coad adds that this trend is going further down the organisation beyond only senior staff and executives.

“When people see their boss come to work with an iPhone or iPad, they naturally want to do the same,” he said.

“So more people down the organisation are being connected using their personal mobile devices.”

As for what devices are used for BYOD by respondents, 49 per cent had Apple devices, 34 per cent had Android and 10 per cent had Windows Phone.

Patrick Budmar covers consumer and enterprise technology breaking news for IDG Communications. Follow Patrick on Twitter at @patrick_budmar.

EDGE 2015:: For all the latest on EDGE 2015 including the keynote speakers visit the EDGE mini-site now

Follow Us

Join the ARN newsletter!

Error: Please check your email address.

Tags Arubra NetworksBYODsmartphones

Upcoming

Slideshows

In Pictures: 7 things we hate about Twitter

In Pictures: 7 things we hate about Twitter

You probably either love Twitter for its quirkiness and brevity or see it as a pointless waste of time. After nearly a decade on the social scene, Twitter still needs to improve its user experience and fill in notable gaps in the service. These seven problems are long overdue for a fix.

In Pictures: 7 things we hate about Twitter
IN PICTURES: EDGE 2015 - Sponsor Briefing

IN PICTURES: EDGE 2015 - Sponsor Briefing

With EDGE 2015 rapidly approaching, ARN and Reseller News NZ held a Sponsors Briefing where ARN publisher and president, Susan Searle, and Events Manager, Alexandra West, ran through the considerable logistics in detail. Attendees then enjoyed some splendid canapes and drinks. EDGE is designed to bring the A/NZ channel together in a collaborative and educational environment. Themed around channel channel leadership, EDGE will be held at the Sheraton Mirage, Port Douglas, July 20-23. Photos by MIKE GEE.

IN PICTURES: EDGE 2015 - Sponsor Briefing
In Pictures: Robots that cook, clean, sing and dance

In Pictures: Robots that cook, clean, sing and dance

Cooking, learning language and doing the laundry are a few of the human skills demonstrated by.real humanoid bots featured in the National Geographic movie Robots.

In Pictures: Robots that cook, clean, sing and dance

iasset.com is a channel management ecosystem that automates all major aspects of the entire sales, marketing and service process, including data tracking, integrated learning, knowledge management and product lifecycle management.

Show Comments