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Domino’s Australia users prefer iPhone app

Domino’s Australia users prefer iPhone app

Pizza franchise finds that Apple users are the leaders in ordering pizzas outside of desktop ordering

The iPhone app is the most popular way for Australian customers to order Domino’s pizzas, outside of desktop ordering.

Domino’s Australia CEO, Don Meij, shared this observation during ThoughtWorks Live in Sydney, where he said the iPhone app leads in popularity, followed by the Flash site and the mobile site respectively.

“Apple users are such hungry consumers,” he said.

Meij adds that Domino’s has only done one upgrade to the iPhone app since it was launched.

“If you update it too often, the customer questions the quality of it,” he said.

“We got the first one so right, so it would be crazy to go and waste money on things we don’t need to do.”

Domino’s developed its mobile site in-house, and with it the company is able to see what types of users are ordering pizzas.

Meij said the company now uses those analytics to decide what to build next, and the result of that approach was the Android and iPad apps.

“The Android app cost us four times more to develop than the iPhone app, and it is nowhere near as successful, even though it does do some cooler things,” he said.

Based on the trends it is seeing now, Meij expects 80 per cent of the company’s business to be digital in 2015, and 75 per cent of that will be from smartphones.

Using the analytics also helped Domino’s decide not to develop a Windows Phone 8 app.

“I think we all want Windows Phone to be successful, because we don’t like the duopoly that exists,” Meij said.

“So it would be nice to have three or four key players in the market.”

However, Meij said the reality is that no one places orders on a Windows Phone.

“We don’t know why, as they have the same access as everyone else, and we see the same thing with BlackBerry,” he said.

Once the analytics for Windows Phone improve, Meij said the company is able to “move quickly on that” and develop an app for the platform.

Since smartphones allow the consumer to make a pizza order anywhere at any time, Meij questions the purpose of going through a drive through anymore.

“You can place the order on a smartphone, track it, and time it so you get home, so why would you waste your life sitting in a drive through?”

“With smartphones, that makes no sense at all.”

Bigger than Coke

Domino’s has not only embraced online and mobile to modernise the order process, but also to track customer feedback.

“You rate the order out of a five star, we give that back to stores straight away to see how they are performing, and we can track the store’s products, service and image, which are the three big measures for our business,” Meij said.

More recently, Domino’s posts those results live on Facebook so users can see the store’s performance.

“When we first shared this with franchisees, they asked if we were trying to kill them,” Meij said.

“However, targeting this feedback is one of the main ways we are able to find, then fix, challenges that our customers face.”

In the Netherlands, the feedback process has been taken a step further, where the score shows up on the main screen at the store while the customer is still there.

“The staff may try to fix their service so that the customer might even re-rate them,” Meij said.

Despite dealing with the negative feedback, Domino’s has grown to become the fourth largest Australian brand by likes on Facebook, beating out companies such as Coca-Cola.

Patrick Budmar covers consumer and enterprise technology breaking news for IDG Communications. Follow Patrick on Twitter at @patrick_budmar.

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