Mobile telecommunications vital to Australia’s productivity: Deloitte

Estimates a boost of nearly $12 billion to the economy from current developments by 2025

The mobile telecommunications space plays a vital role in lifting Australia’s productivity performance, and current developments are expected to boost the economy by up to $25 billion by 2025, according to professional services firm, Deloitte.

In its latest report, Mobile Nation: The economic and social impacts of mobile technology , Deloitte highlighted the economic and social impacts of mobile technology, including an estimated productivity benefit of $11.8 billion for the modelled period of 2012-2025.

In 2011 alone, the productivity contribution to the Australian economy was estimated tat $495 million, with benefits expected to grow to $1.3 billion in 2016.

The report was commissioned by Australian Mobile Telecommunications Association (AMTA), the peak body for the mobile telecommunications industry in Australia.

AMTA CEO, Chris Althaus, claimed the mobile telecommunications industry is changing from what was a relatively simple supply chain – from hardware manufacturers to final customers – to an emerging ecosystem of mobile technologies that is driving economic change and productivity growth. “The right framework will ensure Australia is best placed to gain from the opportunities offered by these latest innovations,” Althaus said.

According to Deloitte access economics director, Dr. Ric Simes, technology developments in the mobile industry have the potential to reverse Australia’s declining productivity performance. “The mobile consumer, and mobile communication in day-to-day life, is changing how business operates and making our economy more productive,” he said.

The report also considered the business and social impacts of mobile technology.

The report stated that social impacts range from individual identity, changes for communities and relationships, shifts in work-life balances, and how mobiles affect the nation. “Of course, the full long-term social impacts of mobiles may not be unambiguously positive and are emerging only slowly. As they do, policy makers are being asked to make ongoing assessments to also shape the impacts,” Dr. Simes added.

Other key findings include:

  • In 2011-2012, the total value added by the mobile telecommunications industry was $14.1 billion, with $7.6 billion in direct contribution and $6.5 billion in indirect activity within related sectors and across the economy.

  • Mobile technologies are being driven by employees more than the IT department, with employees wanting to use their own mobile at work, driving the ‘bring your own device’ (BYOD) trend.

  • Mobile is increasingly the most important interaction businesses will have with customers, making it a key platform for marketing, sales, and delivery of new mobile services.

  • To maximise the benefits of mobility in the digital economy spectrum, policy settings must be reviewed and allow for staged expansion of spectrum resources to mobile broadband.

Tags AMTAmobilityeconomyAMTA Chris AlthausproductivitymobileTelecommunicationsBYODDeloittedigitaltechnology developments

More about AMTAAustralian Mobile Telecommunications Associationmobiles

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