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Rumour: Apple's alleged cheaper iPhone could have see-through plastic design

Rumour: Apple's alleged cheaper iPhone could have see-through plastic design

The latest speculation about the iPhone mini claims Apple will use plastic to cut costs

Apple's rumoured cheaper iPhone, often dubbed iPhone mini, could have a see-through plastic chassis that's made in the US, according to a new report.

Digitimes cites "sources from the upstream supply chain", who claim that Apple will use plastic instead of the traditional glass or aluminium in order to cut costs and sell the entry-level iPhone for less.

The report says that the cheaper iPhone's plastic body could be made by a US-based electronic manufacturing service provider.

Alternatively, Apple could combine plastic and metal in order to make its low-cost iPhone, with the internal metal parts visible through the plastic, the sources said.

SEE ALSO: iPad mini 2 release date, rumours and images

According to the report, Apple is currently testing components for the cheaper iPhone ahead of a possible launch in the second half of 2013.

Digitimes' report follows last week's influx of iPhone mini speculation that ended with an interview published by the Shanghai Evening News and reported on by Reuters, in which Apple's Phil Schiller allegedly dismissed the idea of a cheaper iPhone, saying that it's not Apple's "product development plan".

However, Reuters later retracted its report following "substantial changes" that were made to the original report, reigniting the chatter about the possibility of a cheaper iPhone again.

SEE: Apple faces tough choice on cheaper iPhone

AND: Will Apple introduce a lower-priced iPhone?

Related:

Apple analyst reduced AAPL targets on cheap iPhone margin concerns

Cheaper iPhone could cost £61, but may damage Apple's brand

iPhone 6 release date, rumours and leaked images

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